Two Arrested in Clay County for Drugs, Handgun Possession

Clay County Sheriff's Office in Brazil, Ind.

Jami Busbin, 45, and Denton Pate, 47, were arrested Feb. 10 for possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia, possession of a syringe and possession of a handgun without a license.

Clay County Sheriff’s deputies received a call that there was a vehicle parked in the road in the Harmony area, and that the female driver had gotten out of the car. Busbin was allegedly seen throwing trash on the ground and striking her passenger, before driving off quickly.

Officers spotted the vehicle, traveling westward on County Road 900 North, near County Road 100 East, and conducted a traffic stop. They allegedly saw Busbin and Pate trying to hide some items, which turned out to be drug paraphernalia and a small bag containing methamphetamine.

Brazil City Police K-9 Unit was called in to assist in searching the vehicle. Additional items found included several bags of methamphetamine, marijuana, paraphernalia and a loaded 32-caliber handgun.

Busbin and Pate were transported to the Clay County Jail. Bond for Busbin was set at $10,000 and bond for Pate was set at $25,000.

Peregrine Falcon Nest Box Relocated

Steven Lima, professor of biology at Indiana State University, holds a peregrine falcon chick in 2012.

With the impending demolition of Statesman Towers, biologists at Indiana State University have relocated the nesting box for a pair of peregrine falcons.

The new box was placed Dec. 18 on the southeast corner of the Sycamore Building, located downtown between Ohio Street and Wabash Avenue and owned by Sunset Harbor Inc., said Steven Lima, professor of biology at Indiana State.

The 6-year-old male falcon from Indianapolis and his mate have yet to use the new box, but their old Statesman Tower nest box was removed about a month ago.

“We hope they move when they start demolition over there soon. It should be enough of a disruption to get them to at least go someplace else,” Lima said. “We do not know if they have found the new box or not. We’ll see what happens.”

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Air-conditioning units have been removed from the towers, and the one-story connecting structure between the twin 15-story towers is first up for demolition, Lima said.

“One of the reasons we’re starting the demolition in the winter is to get them to move,” Lima said. “The preference was to (raze the buildings) in the spring, but that would have been a problem. So the university decided they can start on some stuff during the winter — just to make it uncomfortable (for the falcons), so they go somewhere else before they start nesting.”

Peregrine falcons lay their eggs the first week in April like “clockwork,” Lima said.

The Statesman Towers location has been the site of two successful hatchings — the first of which for the formerly endangered species in 50 years. The first hatching in 2012 resulted in three chicks. Last year, the male mated with a different female and hatched two chicks, which were lost about a month later in a severe spring storm.

Lima said he’s been getting concerned emails from the falcons’ fans.

“The university has been really good about accommodating these birds over the years, even in timing the destruction of the buildings,” Lima said.

Based on the pair’s hunting habits, biologists say they think the falcons prefer the eastern and western areas of Terre Haute, rather than southern parts of the city. A falcon decoy to be placed on the new box is currently on order.

“They’ll see another falcon, which will really tick them off and get them to come over,” Lima said. “My guess is if they see something that looks like another falcon, they’ll come over … and notice another box.”

If anyone sees the falcons on top of the Sycamore Building, they’re asked to contact the university, Lima said.

“Hopefully, we can get them to move. I knew removing the nest box would not be enough,” Lima said. “I hope the combination of noise and putting up a decoy can at least get them to go over there.”

Biology graduate student Kathleen Spicer described Sunset Harbor’s management as gracious for letting them use the roof of the building, which is the tallest structure in the city and the birds’ best option. The relationship will be low-maintenance, she said.

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“The more we can leave them alone and not disturb them, the better off they are,” Spicer said.

For now, they’re still frequenting Statesman Towers’ familiar cliff-like structure.

“Going up to take down the nest box, the male and female were in the area. They were none too happy to see us on that roof. They made their vocal displeasure obvious,” Spicer said.

Peregrine falcons became endangered in the 1960s because of the wide use of the insecticide DDT that poisoned their food supply. As top predators, the birds absorbed large amounts of the chemical from ingesting their prey and became unable to reproduce.

The falcons were removed from the endangered species list in 1999. In the Midwest, there are about 300 pairs, which are still monitored by wildlife officials.

“They’re no longer endangered and they’re no longer in trouble, so it’s not a big blow to their population if they miss a season,” Lima said. “If they don’t go (to the new nest box), they don’t go. They make their own decisions. So, we might miss a year. I doubt they’ll abandon the city — it’s their city.”

John Castrale, nongame bird biologist for Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife, cleans out the peregrine falcon nest box atop Indiana State University’s Statesman Towers in 2014. Kathleen Spicer, a biology graduate student at Indiana State University, holds a peregrine falcon in 2014. A female peregrine falcon flies above the Statesman Towers in 2012 as officials remove her chicks for banding.

Indiana State Police Recover Stolen Vehicle in Vincennes, Two Vincennes Men Arrested

Trevor D. Pritchard

Knox County – Indiana State Police received information yesterday that a stolen 2000 GMC pickup truck was possibly in the Vincennes area. At approximately 6:20 p.m., Trooper Brad Mull spotted the vehicle in a parking lot near the Fast Break Marathon gas station located on 6th Street at Executive Blvd.

The driver was identified as Trevor D. Pritchard, 19, of Vincennes. A passenger was identified as Brandon M. Weber, 27, of Vincennes. During a search of the vehicle troopers found a syringe and drug paraphernalia.

Further investigation revealed the vehicle had been reported stolen approximately two-weeks ago from Ferdinand. Pritchard and Weber were arrested and taken to the Knox County Jail where they are currently being held on bond.

Arrested and Charges:

Trevor D. Pritchard, 19, 1030 South 18th Street, Vincennes, IN
Auto Theft, Level 6 Felony
Possession of a Syringe, Level 6 Felony
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Class A Misdemeanor
Brandon M. Weber, 27, 504 East Locust Street, Vincennes, IN
Possession of a Syringe, Level 6 Felony
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Class A Misdemeanor

Arresting Officer: Trooper Brad Mull, Indiana State Police

Assisting Agencies: Vincennes Police and Knox County Sheriff’s Office

Brandon M. Weber

Brandon M. Weber

Sullivan City Council Discusses Problems With Grease in Sewer Line

Sullivan Sewer Department Superintendent Chris Olson (standing) talks about ongoing problem with restaurant grease in the system Tuesday evening during the Sullivan City Council meeting.

SULLIVAN-  Sullivan Mayor Clint Lamb noted during the city council meeting tonight that he has appointed Brian Pound, city building commissioner, and sewer department superintendent Chris Olson as restaurant inspectors to tackle the issue of grease clogging a sewer line.

Lamb suggested the two appointees follow up regular inspections with a letter, upon a recommendation by city attorney Angela Bullock, that a schedule of inspections take place, with the potential for citations for those not in compliance with the code.

“That’s been the problem, nobody’s followed up,” Olson said, explaining that there are three restaurants on the line. He added that no matter what, with any restaurant, you’re going to have problems with grease.

In other business:

  • Harris Street storm water project is tentatively set for April, weather permitting.
  • Sullivan City Police Chief Jesse Morin said the department has been asked to speak with students at RCA Thursday morning about bullying and respect. He also noted there have been several calls for extra patrols this month.
  • Sullivan Fire Chief Rob Robertson reported that personnel is completing required EMS training at Sullivan County Community Hospital.
  • Chris Waymier, street superintendent, asked the council permission to place several pieces of city equipment in the upcoming Future Farmer’s of America Auction and said he will also address the Board of Public Works regarding the matter. The council unanimously approved a motion by Jack Alexander that the items could be placed in the auction.  Waymier also reported the department personnel has been patching potholes around the city.They’ve used the new street sweeper on Wolfe Street for salt and sand. They’ve been working on a cleaning a ditch on N. State Street, where he said a water problem on the street. He said another problem with standing water is at E. Beech and Stewart Streets. He updated the council on clean-up of the former Runt’s site.

Lucy Perry can be reached at lperry@newsbarb.com

UPDATE: Vigo and Clay Schools Placed on Lockdown After Threats

Suspect in school threats apprehended today

UPDATE: Chief Deputy John Moats, of the Vigo County Sheriff’s Office reports that the suspect in today’s school threats is identified as Mark Ralston. According to Moats: Ralston exited the residence without incident and surrendered to officers. Mr. Ralston was transported to a local hospital for evaluation and further investigation. There were no weapons in Ralston’s possession and there are no pending charges at this time.

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One potentially dangerous suspect has been apprehended and an investigation is ongoing after Vigo and Clay County schools were placed on lockdown today.

Vigo and Clay County school corporations were placed on lockdown this morning after information was received by law enforcement officials regarding a potentially suicidal male who posted threats on social media.

According to a report from the Clay County Sheriff’s Office,  during the investigation by the Vigo County Sheriff’s Office, several more threats were made by the suspect.  The Clay County Sheriff’s Office was then alerted the suspect was in Clay County, possibly the Bowling Green area.

As officers canvased the area, more theats allegedly were made, resulting in the decision to lock down the schools.It is noted that the threats were targeted specifially to Vigo County Schools. Clay County schools were manned with off duty officers while the manhunt ensued.

The yet-to-be identified male suspect was located in rural Owen County at around 2:45 p.m., just outside Bowling Green, near his mother’s residence. He surrendered to officers peacefully and is being held in Vigo County, according to the report.

Sullivan County Community Hospital Announces New Chief Financial Officer

Sullivan County Community Hospital

SULLIVAN- Sullivan County Community Hospital recently announced its new Chief Financial Officer, experienced leader Scott Andritsch, to oversee operations, cost management, service excellence, efficiency, program implementation, and new technologies for SCCH.

Andritsch, a native of Milwaukee, Wis, most recently served as Chief Financial Officer/Vice President of Finance for IU Health Morgan Hospital in Martinsville, Ind, where he provided executive leadership for finance, revenue cycle and support areas.

“It gives me great pleasure to announce that Scott R. Andritsch has accepted the position as SCCH’s new Chief Financial Officer,” said CEO Michelle Franklin. “Scott has worked at many levels in the healthcare financial arena, from director, controller to CFO positions.  He brings over 23 years of experience with him.”

Andritsch holds a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Indiana Wesleyan University, a Bachelor’s Degree in Organizational Leadership from Huntington University, and an Associate’ s Degree in Accounting from the International Business College.  Additionally, Andritsch is a member of the Indiana Hospital Association Council on Finance, the Healthcare Financial Management Association and the American College of Healthcare Executives.

“I am extremely impressed with the leadership, professionalism and dedication of everyone who works at SCCH,” Andritsch said.   I am very pleased and honored to be a part of this hospital’s team and the community that it serves.”

Andritsch and his wife, Alyssa, have eight children, three grandchildren and recently moved from Mooresville, Ind, to Sullivan, Ind.

Two Shelburn Men Facing Multiple Meth-Related Charges

Bradley Stuck and Lucas Vilchuck

Lucas M. Vilchuck, 25, and Bradley W. Stuck, 57, both of Shelburn, are charged with possession of methamphetamine, dumping controlled substance waste and maintaining a common nuisance, all level 6 felonies; and possession of paraphernalia, a class A misdemeanor.

Both are also charged with dealing in methamphetamine — a level 4 felony for Vilchuck and level 5 for Stuck.

Indiana State Trooper Shilo R. Raulston reported that on Jan. 20, he got a “precursor log” from a Shelburn business. The log includes names of the people who have purchased items that can be used in making methamphetamine, such as lithium batteries and instant cold packs that contain ammonium nitrate.

Vilchuck was reportedly on the log for several purchases of these, between Jan. 3 and Jan. 9. On Jan. 26, Raulston stated, he searched the national precursor exchange log, and found that Vilchuck had also bought a pseudoephedrine-containing medication on Jan. 22.

After determining Vilchuck’s address, Raulston reportedly found that Stuck lives at the same residence and had also bought pseudoephedrine on Jan. 14 and a cold compress pack on Nov. 25, 2014.

Raulston traveled to the Shelburn home on Jan. 26 and Stuck answered the door. Raulston reported his behavior as erratic, with his mood quickly changing between irritated and cooperative. Raulston stated that he asked Stuck about his and Vilchuck’s pseudoephedrine purchases, and he allegedly claimed he had bought it for his mother.

Stuck also allegedly said that Vilchuck was no longer living there and had gone to rehab. Stuck reportedly continued to have “inconsistencies with his story,” so Raulston called for backup. The dispatcher reportedly said there had been many calls to this residence, so Raulston decided that he and other officers should check to see who was home.

Raulston reported that he saw two cut straws like those sometimes used to ingest methamphetamine and asked Stuck if he could search the residence. He allegedly consented. Items reportedly found in Stuck’s room included two baggies with the corners cut out and a hypodermic syringe.

Raulston spoke to Vilchuck on the phone and Vilchuck allegedly gave him permission to search his room as well, and he found syringes in there.

In other parts of the home and garage, officers reportedly found many other items such as straws containing an off-white powdery substance, a glass marijuana pipe, more syringes and baggies, tubing, a soda bottle containing an off-white granular substance, an empty cold pack box, cut open instant cold pack, two empty nasal decongestant boxes, cut open lithium batteries and more evidence of a one-pot meth lab.

Bond for Vilchuck was set at $48,000 and bond for Stuck was set at $43,000.

Truck Driver Tests Positive for Marijuana and Cocaine

Indiana State Police

Sullivan County – Yesterday afternoon at 1:13, Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Senior Trooper Byron Goodman stopped a 2015 International box truck on US 41 at Old State 54 for a routine federal motor carrier safety inspection. During the stop, Goodman noticed a smell of what appeared to be marijuana and subsequent search of the vehicle yielded approximately (10) grams of suspected marijuana.

The driver was taken to Sullivan County Community Hospital for a chemical test and tested positive for marijuana and cocaine. The driver was incarcerated in the Sullivan County Jail.

Arrested Driver: Joe A. Carrillo, age 41, of South Bend, Indiana

Charges: Operating a Vehicle While Intoxicated-Endangerment; Operating While Intoxicated with Schedule I or II Controlled Substance; Possession of Marijuana; and Maintaining a Common Nuisance.

Issued traffic citations for license violation and no log book.

The truck was hauling truck parts and operating under Winston, LLC of South Bend, Indiana. The truck was placed out of service and impounded by Peffley and Hinshaw Wrecker Service.

The commercial vehicle inspection revealed the trucking company was not in administrative compliance with rules and regulations and the driver was not properly licensed to drive the vehicle. Citations were issued.

Assisting was Trooper Erik Smith.

Under the Law, criminal charges are merely accusations and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Monroe County Youth Council Presented With Prestigious 2015 Leading Light Award

Bloomington

Bloomington, Ind. – The members of the Monroe County Youth Council (MCYC) have been selected to receive the 2015 Leading Light Award from the Franklin Initiative of the Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce. This award recognizes an innovative or exemplary program that enhances our education community and will be presented at the Educators of the Year Dinner and Awards program.

The Monroe County Youth Council was created in 2011 and consists of 40 high school students from public and private high schools in Monroe County. The Council holds monthly meetings and organizes youth-led service events. A student leadership team elected from the membership meets quarterly with an adult advisory team made up of community leaders. The Youth Council is staffed by the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network (a program of the City of Bloomington Community and Family Resources Department), the Monroe County Public Library and United Way of Monroe County.

MCYC gives high school students the opportunity — outside of the classroom and across school boundaries — to select impact areas that matter to them, create service projects that address those issues, learn leadership skills and work together to give back to the community through volunteering.

The award nomination was written by Monroe County Youth Council members and Bloomington High School South students, Ivy Kehoe and Jason Cherry.

“MCYC has given us the opportunity to directly interact with community organizations,” Kehoe and Cherry wrote. “Being a leader for other students in MCYC, along with our peers outside of the program, has shown these same organizations that high school students want to be a part of their city and their community, hopefully encouraging more people to volunteer in our county.”

MCYC members are actively planning service projects for Bloomington’s Fourth Annual Global Youth Service Day (GYSD) on Friday, April 17, when 250 high school students will volunteer at youth-led projects focusing on poverty, hunger, environment, animals, education, self-esteem and sexual assault prevention.

For more information about the Monroe County Youth Council, contact Assistant Director of the Bloomington Volunteer Network Lucy Schaich at schaichl@bloomington.in.gov or 812-349-3433 or visit www.monroecountyyouthcouncil.org. To learn more about the awards program, which is a ticketed event, visit Franklin lnitiative or contact Director of Workforce Initiatives Macy Hughes at 812-336-6381 or mhughes@ChamberBloomington.org.

Northeast School Board Approves Retirements, Reviews Policies

Northeast School

In a brief meeting Monday evening the Northwest School Board members discussed the upcoming retirement of two teachers and viewed potential policy changes and updates.

Mark Baker, Superintendent of Schools, asked that the board accept the retirement of Choral Director Gayle McCullough and Special Education Teacher Patti Weinheimer.

“We wish these ladies the best in their retirement,” said Baker. “We hate to see them go, but we wish them the best in their future endeavors.”

McCullough has served the school as choir director as well as band director and filled in other positions in her 40 plus years of service.

Weinheimer served as a teacher in the school system for 35 years.

“There is over 70 years experience there,” said Baker. “It’s going to be hard to replace these ladies.”

The board also reviewed a number of policies that have been changed or updated in some capacity in the last quarter.

Northeast School Corporation uses NEOLA, a company who researches and updates school policies in accordance to new laws and regulations, and was given a new set of updates and changes to current policies for review.

“The board will have choices on some policies to fit them to our school,” said Baker. “Others are changed completely and will be looked into by the board before the second reading next month.”

Some of those policies include the school’s bullying procedures, harassment policies, seclusion procedures, and FMLA proceedings.

The next meeting for the Northeast School Board will be March 9 at 7 p.m.

Indy Man Allegedly Caught Trying to Steal Car in Brazil

Clay County Sheriff's Office in Brazil, Ind.

BRAZIL — The Clay County Sheriff’s Department arrested Chad Carter of Indianapolis on the afternoon of Feb. 7. He has been charged with attempted robbery, a level 5 felony, and two counts of attempted auto theft, a level 6 felony.

The Sheriff’s office was reportedly called at around 3:40 p.m., by a female saying she had seen a man trying to gain entry into vehicles in the parking lot of Burger King, at the intersection of State Roads 59 and 42.

The caller described the suspect as a white male, wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt and blue jeans. A deputy traveled to the scene, where he found a group of people standing near the drive-thru menu board. They each gave the same description of the suspect.

One woman allegedly said that she had seen the suspect walk toward her vehicle and try to open the passenger side door. She told the deputy that she locked it before he could open it.

A second woman reportedly told the deputy that the suspect had opened her minivan’s rear passenger door while her children were sitting inside. He allegedly then shut the door and moved on.

A man told the deputy that he was sitting in his vehicle’s front passenger seat when the suspect tried to open the rear door on the same side. He added that the man then came to the window where he was sitting and reached in the window, which was partially open, and tried to unlock the door.

The man in the vehicle, who reportedly has a concealed carry permit, said he took out his handgun and told the suspect he would shoot him if he did not stop. The man in the vehicle told the deputy that the suspect then ran away, toward the Best Western Hotel.

After speaking with the alleged victims, the deputy walked toward the Best Western, and saw a man who fit the suspect’s description walking out of the hotel. The deputy arrested him.

Carter allegedly admitted to police that he was high on methamphetamine, and had planned to steal one of the cars to get back to Indianapolis.

Linton RadioShack Not Affected by Recent Bankruptcy Deal

RadioShack

The recent announcement that RadioShack will close its doors in a bankruptcy deal with Sprint will not affect the RadioShack store in Linton.

The local store, which is located in the Linton Shopping Center, is not corporate-owned.

“The local store is independently owned and [that] is a corporate decision that will not affect the [Linton] store,” explained Linton’s RadioShack manager, noting that the Linton store will remain open.

The Linton store is located at 1600 A Street Northeast. Store hours are Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and closed Sundays.

Bloomington Man Arrested on Drug Charges in Bloomfield

Shane Walters

Shane A. Walters, 39, of Bloomington, is facing charges of possession of methamphetamine, a level 6 felony; possession of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia, a class A misdemeanor; and possession of marijuana, a class B misdemeanor.

Bloomfield Police Deputy Marshal Marvin C. Holt was dispatched to a Bloomfield business at around 4:30 a.m. Feb. 4 after a possible physical altercation was reported. The store clerk reportedly told Holt, when he arrived, that she thought she saw Walters hit the woman he was arguing with.

The clerk told Holt that Walters and the woman had gone into their motel room, so Holt went to investigate. He stated that a woman answered the door and said there had been an argument, but nothing physical. Holt reportedly checked the room, and there was no male present, but there were “personal items thrown on the floor.”

The woman allegedly said that Walters had left on foot. When deputies arrived to secure the area, Holt stated that he went looking for Walters in town and found him in a convenience store. From his car, he observed Walters going into the restroom, and he entered the store.

The clerk reportedly told Holt that Walters had been behaving strangely, and had bought something, then returned to the restroom twice. According to his probable cause affidavit, Holt waited 15 minutes by the checkout counter before finally knocking on the restroom door and telling Walters he needed to come out.

Walters allegedly said he would be out in a few minutes. Holt stated that he asked the clerk if the restroom had been cleaned recently. She reportedly told him it had, about an hour earlier, and very few people had been in it since.

Deputies Bobby Pierce and Zach Goad had also arrived at that point. When Walters finally exited the restroom, Pierce and Holt patted him down, while Goad went in to check the trash can, toilet and sink.

During the patdown, Holt reported, Pierce found a bulge in Waters’s pocket, which turned out to be a plastic bag containing marijuana, and a short straw that contained a white substance. Walters allegedly claimed the residue was from prescription pills he had ingested.

Goad reportedly found a syringe and two yellow pills that were later confirmed to be valium in the trash can. The syringe contained a clear liquid, and Walters allegedly said he was not sure if it was methamphetamine or heroin.

It was reportedly later determined that Walters did not have a prescription for the valium, and that the substance in the syringe was methamphetamine. Walters allegedly admitted to throwing the items in the trash can, but said they were not his, as he had taken from the woman at the motel.

Walters was assigned an attorney, and a pretrial conference is set for June 10.

City of Linton Honors Fallen Police Officer: Proclaims Feb. 7, 2015 as Fred Cromwell Day

Linton Police Officer Paul Clark, middle, sharing information about his research regarding the death of Fred Cromwell. Police Chief Troy Jerrell, at right, and Mayor John Wilkes, at left, also spoke during the honorary reception.

On Friday, Linton City Hall was the site of an honorary reception for the only Linton Police Officer to be killed in the line of duty.

Linton Mayor John Wilkes read a proclamation establishing Saturday, Feb. 7 as Fred Cromwell Day. Cromwell was killed in the line of duty 100 years ago after serving six days with the local department. He also served as the fire chief prior to serving as an officer.

Linton Police Chief Troy Jerrell thanked the packed room for the show of support regarding the proclamation.

“I would like to thank everyone for their support. This is what the small community is all about,” he said.

“[We] had never came across this information… I almost didn’t believe it at first,” Jerrell added, noting Linton Police Officer Paul Clark researched the matter.

Officer Clark then explained that all law enforcement officers make many sacrifices, but Cromwell is the only Linton Police Officer to have lost his life in the line of duty.

“Everyone here has made many sacrifices, but no one here has lost their lives,” Clark explained, noting his goal in researching the matter was to find out what really happened to Cromwell.

“I believe that sacrifices need to be recognized. People need to know that this sacrifice was made,” Clark also said.

During his research, Clark discovered several newspaper articles about the incident.

One such article from the Cincinnati Enquirer, noted Cromwell was shot and killed by two burglars whom he detected in the clothing store of Louis Friedman on Feb. 7, 1915. According to the same article, bloodhounds, owned by the Linton Police Department, lost the trail about three miles southeast of Linton, where the burglars stole two horses from James Reed, a farmer living in Lyons.

Another such article, from the Indianapolis News, noted that Cromwell was killed instantly during a revolver fight at the store. Furthermore, the article states Cromwell, a night policeman, was shot in the head and stomach and that his revolver displayed three empty cartridges. There were no witnesses to the scene, but persons aroused by the sound of shots, noted two men running away from the store. The robbers, in their flight, dropped a bag containing 13 pairs of shoes.

Frank Toricelli was arrested by police in Los Angeles in connection with Cromwell’s murder in March, 1915. He was later charged with the murder of Cromwell and served life in prison.

Saturday, Feb. 7 marked 100 years since Cromwell’s death.

Several members of Cromwell’s family were present during the proclamation reading. Becky Yung, Cromwell’s granddaughter, was one of them.

She explained that the story of her grandfather was well-known within the family, but that through Clark’s research additional details were uncovered.

“We learned that [Cromwell] was apprehended and sentenced to prison – that part we did not know,” Yung explained.

City of Linton Honors Fallen Police Officer: Proclaims Feb. 7, 2015 as Fred Cromwell Day

Linton Police Officer Paul Clark, middle, sharing information about his research regarding the death of Fred Cromwell. Police Chief Troy Jerrell, at right, and Mayor John Wilkes, at left, also spoke during the honorary reception.

On Friday, Linton City Hall was the site of an honorary reception for the only Linton Police Officer to be killed in the line of duty.

Linton Mayor John Wilkes read a proclamation establishing Saturday, Feb. 7 as Fred Cromwell Day. Cromwell was killed in the line of duty 100 years ago after serving six days with the local department. He also served as the fire chief prior to serving as an officer.

Linton Police Chief Troy Jerrell thanked the packed room for the show of support regarding the proclamation.

“I would like to thank everyone for their support. This is what the small community is all about,” he said.

“[We] had never came across this information… I almost didn’t believe it at first,” Jerrell added, noting Linton Police Officer Paul Clark researched the matter.

Officer Clark then explained that all law enforcement officers make many sacrifices, but Cromwell is the only Linton Police Officer to have lost his life in the line of duty.

“Everyone here has made many sacrifices, but no one here has lost their lives,” Clark explained, noting his goal in researching the matter was to find out what really happened to Cromwell.

“I believe that sacrifices need to be recognized. People need to know that this sacrifice was made,” Clark also said.

During his research, Clark discovered several newspaper articles about the incident.

One such article from the Cincinnati Enquirer, noted Cromwell was shot and killed by two burglars whom he detected in the clothing store of Louis Friedman on Feb. 7, 1915. According to the same article, bloodhounds, owned by the Linton Police Department, lost the trail about three miles southeast of Linton, where the burglars stole two horses from James Reed, a farmer living in Lyons.

Another such article, from the Indianapolis News, noted that Cromwell was killed instantly during a revolver fight at the store. Furthermore, the article states Cromwell, a night policeman, was shot in the head and stomach and that his revolver displayed three empty cartridges. There were no witnesses to the scene, but persons aroused by the sound of shots, noted two men running away from the store. The robbers, in their flight, dropped a bag containing 13 pairs of shoes.

Frank Toricelli was arrested by police in Los Angeles in connection with Cromwell’s murder in March, 1915. He was later charged with the murder of Cromwell and served life in prison.

Saturday, Feb. 7 marked 100 years since Cromwell’s death.

Several members of Cromwell’s family were present during the proclamation reading. Becky Yung, Cromwell’s granddaughter, was one of them.

She explained that the story of her grandfather was well-known within the family, but that through Clark’s research additional details were uncovered.

“We learned that [Cromwell] was apprehended and sentenced to prison – that part we did not know,” Yung explained.

Greene County Candidate List for the 2015 Primary

courthouse

Bloomfield Clerk-Treasurer

Sondra Thompson, Republican

Jasonville Mayor

Roy L. Terrell, Sr., Democrat

Jasonville Clerk-Treasurer

Jane Landry, Democrat

Jasonville Council ‘At Large’

Bradley J. Duncan, Democrat

Matthew W. Hill, Republican

Jasonville Council Member Ward 1

Kent May, Republican

Jasonville Council Member Ward 2

Steven E. Lee, Democrat

Kelly Portteus, Democrat

Jasonville Council Member Ward 3

Peggy Sluder, Democrat

Jasonville Council Member Ward 4

Doug Hudson, Democrat

Linton Mayor

Billie Joe Mason, Democrat

John A. Wilkes, Democrat

Linda Bedwell, Democrat

Linton Clerk-Treasurer

Jack Shelton, Democrat

Jathan K. Wright, Democrat

John D. Preble, Republican

Linton Council Member Ward 3

Tony Richards, Democrat

Linton Council Member Ward 4

Richard Kaiser, Democrat

Linton Council Member Ward 5

Fred Markle, Democrat

Linton Council Member Ward 6

Jeff Sparks, Democrat

Christopher M. Wathen, Republican

Linton Council Member Ward 7

Silas Gennicks, Democrat

Jerry L. Ellett, Democrat

George N. Skeel, Democrat

Jerry May, Democrat

Gregory R. Sapp, Republican

Lyons  Clerk-Treasurer

Darla Abbott Robison, Republican

Lyons Town Board

Michelle Emmons, Democrat

Kimberly Sue Nickeless, Republican

Scott W. Powers, Republican

Worthington Clerk-Treasurer

Gloria Klass, Democrat

Worthington Town Board Ward 1

Tom Franklin, Republican

Michael R. McCafferty, Republican

James M. Roberston, Republican

Worthington Town Board Ward 2

Terressa E. Sparks, Democrat

Worthington Town Board Ward 3

Lena R. Johnson, Democrat

Robert Van Sterling, Democrat

Barack Obama Lays Out Free College Plan in Indianapolis

President Barack Obama answers a spectator question at Ivy Tech Community College.

INDIANAPOLIS – President Barack Obama received a warm Indiana welcome at Ivy Tech Community College here today. Many students and faculty members were happy to hear more details about his latest proposed budget, which includes funding for students to attend two years at a community college for free.

After a glowing introduction from Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, Obama laid out some of his plans for what he is calling “Middle Class Economics.” He said the key to continued economic growth and success for the middle class will be Democrats and Republicans setting aside their differences to achieve what is best for the country.

“In parts of Indiana, the only blue you will ever see is on Colts signs,” Obama joked. “And in Chicago, the only red is for the Chicago Bulls.”

However, he said that he feels people on both sides have more in common than they may think. He added that Washington has to be willing to have a “healthy debate” about how to help all Americans have a brighter future.

Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard introduces President Barack Obama at Ivy Tech Community College in Indianapolis. President Barack Obama listens to a question from an Ivy Tech student. Indiana Pacers' voice Eddie White asks President Obama about the status of his basketball game. President Barack Obama shakes hands with members of the crowd after his speech and Q & A session at Ivy Tech in Indianapolis.

Obama’s ideas include making quality childcare and healthcare available and affordable for everyone, providing workers with paid leave and sick days, helping out first-time homebuyers and making it easier to save for retirement. A big part of ensuring that people are able to work in decent paying jobs involves giving them the education they need to get those jobs, he explained.

“I want to make sure that this is a country where hard work is rewarded,” Obama said. “Everybody does best when everybody is doing their part, when everybody’s got a fair shot, everybody’s playing by the same set of rules.”

Under Obama’s plan, students could complete two-year associate’s degrees, or get in their first two years free, and then transfer to another school and pay to complete their desired four-year degrees.

“This is not, you get two years of free goofing off,” Obama explained. “This is to help you achieve your goals, but you have to put in the effort.”

Those who want to take advantage of free college courses would not be getting a “completely free lunch,” as Obama put it, but would have to maintain at least a 2.5 grade point average, keep their attendance up and stay on track to graduate on time.

“The good news is we can actually afford to pay for all of this,” he told the crowd. “We don’t have to add to our deficits, if we’ve got some smart spending cuts, and if we fix the tax code that is filled up with specific interest loopholes and kickbacks for folks that don’t need them.”

Obama cited a current trust fund loophole that he said allows the top one percent to avoid paying taxes on unearned income, and companies that currently have $2 trillion overseas that they are not paying taxes on. He added that he wants to offer tax breaks to companies that stay and keep their money in the United States.

“I’m not pushing these ideas for my sake,” he said. “I’m pushing them because I think this is where America needs to go.”

Additionally, he said, he feels that if others in Washington have better ideas, they should step up and share them.

“If Republicans disagree with the way I’m trying to solve these problems, they should put forward their own plans, and I’m happy to look at them, but what we can’t do is ignore the problems and pretend that they don’t matter, or pretend that families aren’t out there struggling and doing their best,” Obama said.

After speaking, Obama fielded a number of questions from the audience that ranged from a light-hearted challenge from the Indiana Pacers’ Eddie White for the President to play Indiana Fever star Tamika Catchings in a game of one-on-one to more serious inquiries, like how the free college proposal could affect the College Choice 529 Plan and the value of having an associate’s degree.

In the meantime, he encouraged Hoosiers to make sure that their voices are heard. The system does not work, he said, unless the people get involved.

2015 Primary: Sullivan City Election Candidates

Sulivan City Hall


2015 Primary, Sullivan City

Election candidates

 

DEMOCRATIC

MAYOR

CLINT D. LAMB

CLERK-TREASURER

SUE PITTS

COUNCIL DISTRICT #1

JACK ALEXANDER

JOHN M. ELLINGTON

COUNCIL DISTRICT #2

GENE BONHAM

COUNCIL DISTRICT #3

RAYMOND PIRTLE

COUNCIL DISTRICT #4

SCOTT BROWN

THOMAS WICZULIS

COUNCIL-AT-LARGE

STEVEN D. MARTINDALE

JIM MINKS

REPUBLICAN

MAYOR

JEFF WAMSLEY

CLERK-TREASURER

ROBERT (BOB) DICKERSON

COUNCIL DISTRICT #1

NO CANDIDATE

COUNCIL DISTRICT #2

JOHN G. MCLAUGHLIN V

COUNCIL DISTRICT #3

NO CANDIDATE

COUNCIL DISTRICT #4

ELI TRIPPS

COUNCIL-AT-LARGE

JEFF A. TINCHER

Disabled Vehicle Check Leads To Heroin Arrests in Clay County

Indiana State Police

Clay County – This morning at 9:30 AM, ISP Trooper Brandon Mullen came upon a disabled vehicle on Interstate 70 westbound near the 29 mile marker. As Mullen approached the vehicle, he found the male driver in the act of using heroin with a syringe. Trooper Mullen then removed the male and a female passenger from the vehicle and summoned assistance along with an ambulance due to the intoxication of the individuals and the severity of the drug.

The male had in his possession a syringe, and spoon with a liquid substance. The female was found to have in her possession nearly 3.0 grams of Heroin in a plastic bag in her undergarments. Both individuals were checked out by emergency medical technicians and released to Trooper Mullen.

All evidence field tested positive for Heroin and will be sent to the Indiana State Lab for certification. Both individuals transported to Clay County Jail for Possession of Heroin and Possession of Paraphernalia.

Arrested: Tyler Jackson, Age 23, of Terre Haute, IN Preliminary Charges: Possession of Heroin; and Possession of Paraphernalia

Arrested: Shauna Sheets, Age 27, of Terre Haute, IN Preliminary Charges: Possession of Heroin; and Possession of Paraphernalia

Assisting:Troopers Michael Wood and Yan Dravigne, and CARE ambulance service.

Under the Law, criminal charges are merely accusations and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Drugs

Indiana State Professor Nominated Word of the Year

Indiana State University

An Indiana State University professor who nominated the much-buzzed-about 2014 Word of the Year downplays her role, saying she simply said what everyone else was thinking.

The American Dialect Society selected #blacklivesmatter as the Word of the Year by an overwhelming majority — 196 votes, compared to just 11 votes for the second-place nominee.

“I just nominated it. I didn’t do anything really important,” said Leslie Barratt, professor of linguistics at Indiana State. “I just stood up when someone needed to stand up. That was not the important thing — the important thing is the people behind the issue, who had been thinking about it for weeks and months.”

While Barratt has received both support and criticism — including a racist email from a stranger that she deleted — for her nomination, she said she’s glad Sonja Lanehart, an African-American linguistics professor at the University of Texas-San Antonio, has been getting most of the publicity, as Lanehart was really the person behind the momentum.

Still, Barratt, who sits on the diversity council at Indiana State, is glad she had the opportunity to be an advocate for an important cause.

“People advocating for themselves are sometimes taken less seriously. ‘Of course you feel this way because …’ So when you’re not in the group in some way, you’re in a better position to advocate,” she said. “It affects us all. Racial tension doesn’t help anyone — having people or police not trusting groups of people, it just hurts society.”

Barratt and Betty Phillips, also a professor of linguistics, attended the joint conference of the Dialect Society and Linguistics Society of America on Jan. 9 in Portland, Ore. Both professors are retiring at the end of the semester and were recruiting new talent for the department.

While dictionary publishers also select their annual picks, the Dialect Society invented the practice 25 years ago. Barratt has nominated words in the past — “Pokemania” in 2000 — but this year’s conference had a much different tone.

“Most of the nominations and momentum were for very politically charged words, because this was a year of political and social and racial turmoil and tension,” Barratt said. “There were a lot of terms that expressed that. ‘Columbusing’ (meaning cultural appropriation) was one of the words, ‘manspreading’ (referring to a man sitting with one’s legs wide on public transit in a way that blocks other seats). Some of the hashtags were ‘#whyIstayed’ and ‘notallmen.’”

With such passion driving many of the nominees, the room was overflowing with people. Barratt, at just 5-feet tall, had to work her way to the front of the room. When the time came to nominate Word of the Year, Barratt found herself near the microphone.

“It’s clear all of us in this room feel this way — it’s a powerful issue and we need to make this statement,” she said. “The one Word of the Year is the only word that gets out into the media. I thought, ‘I’m close to the microphone; I’m going to do it.’ I didn’t really think more than a split second about it.”

Barratt grew up in “a very integrated area with lots of different cultures with immigrants from different places” near New York City and participated in the Civil Rights Movement.

“I heard Coretta Scott King speak twice. There were all kinds of protests in the ’60s and ’70s that I saw and participated in,” she said. “Progress has been in the laws but not in the enforcement and not in society.”

The United States isn’t alone in its racial struggles, though, Barratt said.

“When we lived in China, some people would literally cross the street to move away from me or especially my husband, who is very tall and looks Russian. Children would hide or run away,” she said. “It was interesting to be on the other side.”

The Word of the Year being a hashtag has scandalized some traditionalists, as a hashtag is often a phrase and technically not a word.

“Hashtags are becoming units — they are units of language. A word is just a unit of language, and it’s not even the smallest unit of language,” Barratt said. “I think it is legitimate. Languages are in constant change.”

Barratt herself doesn’t have a Twitter account, nor does she even use hashtags.

“As an older person, I like the idea of a hashtag being a word. As a linguist, that resonates with me,” she said. “I’ve seen them become units — even though I’m not inventing them and using them, they’ve become units to me, too. If they’ve become units to me — someone who doesn’t use them — then clearly, they’re units to the younger generations.”

When one is trying to learn a language, it’s a moving target, Barratt said. Take, for instance, the device almost all of us have in our purses or pockets to make phone calls. First, it was a “mobile phone,” then “cell phone,” now “iPhone” or simply “smart device.”

“Linguists don’t get horrified (by change); we get fascinated. Linguistics is a science,” she said. “Some people study corpses, or some people study other things that people find unpleasant. There are many linguists who study curse words or other parts that people find unpleasant. Hashtags themselves aren’t unpleasant, and hashtags are powerful. To some extent, they’re like slogans or emblems. They’re becoming a way that people voice things sometimes.”

“I hope someone writes a book on (hashtags) soon, but it’ll be outdated the minute they write it,” she added. “That’s the problem with looking at modern language changes.”

Axelrod: A ‘Believer’ Politics is a Means to Confront Challenges, Improve the Future

David Axelrod addresses a crowd at ISU Thursay.

TERRE HAUTE- Former senior political adviser David Axelrod believes that, through a combined effort, the world can become a better place.

After spending the day with students and faculty at Indiana State University Thursday, he joked with the audience in Tilson Auditorium, that aside from basketball legend Larry Bird, he hadn’t really known much about the university before he arrived in Terre Haute.

During his visit, though, he said he quickly became inspired by the level of community service in which the students, faculty and staff are involved.

“This was very,very meaningful to me. Because, to me, that’s sort of my concept of politics,” he said. “ I don’t view politics as a contest between the red team and the blue team; I view it as a means to confront challenges and problems, to improve communities.”

Axelrod noted that, in his new book, “Believer: My Forty Years in Politics,” the premise behind the work is that politcs is about more than simply winning elections, it’s about securing the future. He added that he came to that belief at a very young age.

He was too young to remember, or comprehend, the words the awestruck crowd heard that day. But he never forgot the importance of the occasion, which forshadowed his long career in politics.

“Very, very  few people can point to the exact date — the time and the place — where lifelong passion began, but I can,” he said, explaining that presidential candidate John F. Kennedy had visited his hometown, when he was just 5-years-old, in New York. His babysitter decided to take him to see the “dashing young senator.”

Axelrod served as senior adviser to President Barack Obama, senior adviser to the Obama-Biden Presidential Transition, senior strategist to Barack Obama’s historic campaign for the presidency in 2008 and his 2012 re-election campaign. Today, he serves as the director of the  Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago and is a senior political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC television networks, according to a press release.

Axelrod spent eight years as a reporter for The Chicago Tribune before entering politics in 1984, where he covered national, state and local politics. He also served as the Tribune’s City Hall bureau chief.

The first of several notorious political campaigns he was associated with was with Rep. Paul Simon (D-IL.)

“Like me, he had started off as a newspaperman,” Axelrod said, adding that SImon entered politics at a young age, as a crusader and advocate for civil rights. He would eventually  take “ the leap” from his own newspaper career to join Simon in politics.

Under the Obama Administration, his expertise  prepared him to deal first-hand  in challenges, including an oil spill, economic crisis and health care reform.

He remembers a discussion in the early days of healthcare reform with President Obama.

“He said something that I’ll always remember. He said, ‘what are we here for? Are we here to put our approval rating on a shelf and admire it for the next eight years, or are we here to draw down on it to do things to make a lasting difference for the country?’”

Then when the legislation passed, he recalls that it affected him deepy, as his young daughter had personally been dealing with a serious health complication requiring costly medical care. Meanwhile, he understood the controversy involved in the the changes.

“There are days when you see something like this and you say,’it’s all worth it.’ Because this is how we move our country forward,” he said.

In his concluding remarks, Axelrod told the audience at Tilson Auditorium that one of the reasons he was happy to be on the ISU campus was because he “ relishes the opportunity” to talk to young people, to encourage them to be “baton carriers” in the future.

“Because I’m very mindful of what Robert Kennedy said: ‘The future is not a gift, it’s an achievement. That’s why we do the work,” he said.

Axelrod was born in New York City, and graduated from the University of Chicago. He served as anadjunct professor of communication studies at Northwestern University and has lectured on political media at Harvard University, the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, according to the press release. He and his wife, Susan Landau, have  three children, Lauren, Michael and Ethan.

David Axelrod addresses a crowd at Tilson Auditorium in Terre Haute Thursday evening.

David Axelrod addresses a crowd at Tilson Auditorium in Terre Haute Thursday evening.

According to the press release, Axelrod was recently inducted into The American Association of Political Consultants’ Hall of Fame. During his time at the White House, Axelrod was the Administration’s most frequent presence on the influential Sunday talk shows including NBC’s Meet the Press, ABC’s This Week, CBS’s Face the Nation, FOX News Sunday and CNN’s State of the Union. From 1988 to 2008, Axelrod was the founder and senior partner at the consulting firm AKPD Message and Media, based in Chicago. In that capacity, he managed media strategy and communications for more than 150 local, state and national campaigns, with a focus on progressive candidates and causes.

Lucy Perry can be reached at lperry@newsbarb.com

Bloomfield School District Experiences Mechanical Malfunction in Cafeteria

Bloomfield School new

Bloomfield School District experienced a mechanical malfunction of a cafeteria steamer Thursday at approximately 6 a.m.

The Food Service manager in turning the steamer on this morning to prepare the meal for students encountered a large noise.  The noise and heat resulted in the kitchen fire suppression system being activated.

The steamer is powered by natural gas. The natural gas to the steamer and kitchen oven were immediately turned off.  The kitchen was covered by fire suppression materials.  The kitchen was cleaned by our kitchen staff.

The other kitchen equipment will be professionally cleansed after the fire suppression system is drained and reset.

Today [Thursday, Feb. 5] the Bloomfield School District cafeteria staff served peanut butter sandwiches, salad, fruit, milk, and dessert.

The steamer will be repaired and inspected prior to being used again. The fire suppression system triggered the fire alarm.  Bloomfield School District has an automatic dialer, so a call was automatically made to the Bloomfield Fire Department.  The kitchen and school were inspected and safety of students and staff were taken into account after the equipment malfunction.

Again, maintenance companies from Gooldy and Sons and Koorsen will be on hand to make repairs later on Thursday afternoon.  Bloomfield School District would like to apologize for any inconveniences the disruption in the normal lunch menu caused today for students and parents.

NSWC Crane Linked to Strategic Vision for Southwest Central Indiana to Strengthen Region

crane

Crane, IN – The Strategic Vision for Economic and Community Prosperity in Southwest Central Indiana, released in November 2014, calls out Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane (NSWC Crane) as a major catalyst for continued economic growth in the area.  As the sole federal laboratory within the region, NSWC Crane both contributes to and benefits from key entrepreneurial efforts, technology partnerships, and workforce development components of the regional plan.

“There are some very important efforts and goals identified in this plan that we are excited about for the future of Crane,” stated Brian Blackwell, NSWC Crane’s Director of Engagement. “Workforce development and education components of the plan are of particular interest to NSWC Crane. Our ability to attract, develop and retain this region’s best and brightest talent is always on our mind.  Along with other technology based employers in the region, we recognize that when we can get our regional students interested in the technical jobs we offer at Crane and when we enable them to continue their education in relevant career fields, we benefit from their long term employment.”

The plan calls out the need to build upon NSWC Crane’s relationships with Indiana’s academic institutions, including Indiana University, with a focus on collaborative applied research while leveraging all assets to ensure global relevancy and economic growth.

“Increasing our connections with the State’s colleges and universities has benefits in many ways.  In the case of Indiana University, we have a significant opportunity with our close proximity and with the completion of a key section of I-69 to grow closer, both in terms of our relationship and in connectivity for offering educational programs and resources to our employees,” states Blackwell.

“In addition to educational opportunities we are also focusing on discovering our mutual research and development interests.  NSWC Crane first and foremost has a mission to support the Navy and there are technology areas where IU and Crane can build fundamental research advancement together benefiting both institutions.”

Another area of the plan where NSWC Crane sees a significant benefit for the Navy is in the approach to entrepreneurial activity revolving around NSWC Crane’s intellectual capital.  Through Technology Transfer authorities, NSWC Crane’s patent portfolio can be utilized for commercialization activity by private companies.  The plan calls for Entrepreneurial Hubs, focused on the region’s industry clusters, to be created in the region to help foster economic growth.  NSWC Crane has more than 400 pieces of intellectual property (IP) that could contribute to commercial business opportunities.

“We are excited about the opportunities identified in this plan.  This plan holds promise for the region and it will aid in our ability to accomplish our mission” stated Blackwell.

NSWC Crane is a naval laboratory and a field activity of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) employing 3000 people supporting Special Missions, Strategic Missions and Electronic Warfare. The Warfare Center is responsible for Multi-domain, Multi-Spectral, full life cycle support of technologies and systems to enhance today’s Warfighter capability.

NSWC Crane Linked to Strategic Vision for Southwest Central Indiana to Strengthen Region

crane

Crane, IN – The Strategic Vision for Economic and Community Prosperity in Southwest Central Indiana, released in November 2014, calls out Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane (NSWC Crane) as a major catalyst for continued economic growth in the area.  As the sole federal laboratory within the region, NSWC Crane both contributes to and benefits from key entrepreneurial efforts, technology partnerships, and workforce development components of the regional plan.

“There are some very important efforts and goals identified in this plan that we are excited about for the future of Crane,” stated Brian Blackwell, NSWC Crane’s Director of Engagement. “Workforce development and education components of the plan are of particular interest to NSWC Crane. Our ability to attract, develop and retain this region’s best and brightest talent is always on our mind.  Along with other technology based employers in the region, we recognize that when we can get our regional students interested in the technical jobs we offer at Crane and when we enable them to continue their education in relevant career fields, we benefit from their long term employment.”

The plan calls out the need to build upon NSWC Crane’s relationships with Indiana’s academic institutions, including Indiana University, with a focus on collaborative applied research while leveraging all assets to ensure global relevancy and economic growth.

“Increasing our connections with the State’s colleges and universities has benefits in many ways.  In the case of Indiana University, we have a significant opportunity with our close proximity and with the completion of a key section of I-69 to grow closer, both in terms of our relationship and in connectivity for offering educational programs and resources to our employees,” states Blackwell.

“In addition to educational opportunities we are also focusing on discovering our mutual research and development interests.  NSWC Crane first and foremost has a mission to support the Navy and there are technology areas where IU and Crane can build fundamental research advancement together benefiting both institutions.”

Another area of the plan where NSWC Crane sees a significant benefit for the Navy is in the approach to entrepreneurial activity revolving around NSWC Crane’s intellectual capital.  Through Technology Transfer authorities, NSWC Crane’s patent portfolio can be utilized for commercialization activity by private companies.  The plan calls for Entrepreneurial Hubs, focused on the region’s industry clusters, to be created in the region to help foster economic growth.  NSWC Crane has more than 400 pieces of intellectual property (IP) that could contribute to commercial business opportunities.

“We are excited about the opportunities identified in this plan.  This plan holds promise for the region and it will aid in our ability to accomplish our mission” stated Blackwell.

NSWC Crane is a naval laboratory and a field activity of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) employing 3000 people supporting Special Missions, Strategic Missions and Electronic Warfare. The Warfare Center is responsible for Multi-domain, Multi-Spectral, full life cycle support of technologies and systems to enhance today’s Warfighter capability.

NSWC Crane Linked to Strategic Vision for Southwest Central Indiana to Strengthen Region

crane

Crane, IN – The Strategic Vision for Economic and Community Prosperity in Southwest Central Indiana, released in November 2014, calls out Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane (NSWC Crane) as a major catalyst for continued economic growth in the area.  As the sole federal laboratory within the region, NSWC Crane both contributes to and benefits from key entrepreneurial efforts, technology partnerships, and workforce development components of the regional plan.

“There are some very important efforts and goals identified in this plan that we are excited about for the future of Crane,” stated Brian Blackwell, NSWC Crane’s Director of Engagement. “Workforce development and education components of the plan are of particular interest to NSWC Crane. Our ability to attract, develop and retain this region’s best and brightest talent is always on our mind.  Along with other technology based employers in the region, we recognize that when we can get our regional students interested in the technical jobs we offer at Crane and when we enable them to continue their education in relevant career fields, we benefit from their long term employment.”

The plan calls out the need to build upon NSWC Crane’s relationships with Indiana’s academic institutions, including Indiana University, with a focus on collaborative applied research while leveraging all assets to ensure global relevancy and economic growth.

“Increasing our connections with the State’s colleges and universities has benefits in many ways.  In the case of Indiana University, we have a significant opportunity with our close proximity and with the completion of a key section of I-69 to grow closer, both in terms of our relationship and in connectivity for offering educational programs and resources to our employees,” states Blackwell.

“In addition to educational opportunities we are also focusing on discovering our mutual research and development interests.  NSWC Crane first and foremost has a mission to support the Navy and there are technology areas where IU and Crane can build fundamental research advancement together benefiting both institutions.”

Another area of the plan where NSWC Crane sees a significant benefit for the Navy is in the approach to entrepreneurial activity revolving around NSWC Crane’s intellectual capital.  Through Technology Transfer authorities, NSWC Crane’s patent portfolio can be utilized for commercialization activity by private companies.  The plan calls for Entrepreneurial Hubs, focused on the region’s industry clusters, to be created in the region to help foster economic growth.  NSWC Crane has more than 400 pieces of intellectual property (IP) that could contribute to commercial business opportunities.

“We are excited about the opportunities identified in this plan.  This plan holds promise for the region and it will aid in our ability to accomplish our mission” stated Blackwell.

NSWC Crane is a naval laboratory and a field activity of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) employing 3000 people supporting Special Missions, Strategic Missions and Electronic Warfare. The Warfare Center is responsible for Multi-domain, Multi-Spectral, full life cycle support of technologies and systems to enhance today’s Warfighter capability.