Sheriff’s Dept. Call Logs Feb. 28

The Greene County Sheriff’s Department call logs for Feb. 24 through Feb. 27 included one abandoned 911 call, four abandoned vehicles, five property damage accidents, four bank or residential alarms, two animal complaints, two assists to other departments, one assist to a motorist, one bomb threat, one civil dispute, four domestic disputes, one drive off, two EMS calls, one extra patrol, one fight-in-progress, two interviews, one P.O. violation, one property damage that was not an accident, one reckless driver, one road hazard, four suspicious vehicles or persons, one theft, one threat, five title checks, eight traffic stops, eight transports, one unruly subject, one criminal mischief, two warrant services, and one welfare check.

 

Greene County Sheriff February 28

Clayton S. Page, 26, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for three counts of alleged forgery, a class C felony. His bond is set at $30,000 with an optional amount of $3,000 (ten percent) and as of Friday morning he remained in the Greene County Jail.

Cody M. Williams, 21, of Solsberry, is preliminarily charged with burglary, a class C felony. As of Friday morning he was being held without bond.

Robert B. Covey, 36, of Bloomington, was arrested on a warrant for two counts of alleged auto theft, a class D felony. His bond is set at $8,000 with an optional amount of $800 (ten percent).

John D. May, 34, of Linton, is preliminarily charged with intimidation, a class C felony, battery, a class D felony, and criminal mischief, a class A misdemeanor.

Brandon W. Moore, 27, of Jasonville, was arrested for alleged failure to appear. As of Friday morning, he was being held without bond.

Linton Police February 28

The Linton Police Department’s report for Thursday included one trespassing, one follow-up investigation, two disorderly conducts, two structure fires, one funeral escort, three medical/illness calls, one animal complaint, two thefts/other, one animal or debris in the roadway, two disabled/stranded vehicles, one fingerprinting for a gun permit, one domestic dispute, and three traffic stops.

 

Greene County Sheriff February 27

Caleb W. Moffatt, 20, of Lyons, was arrested on a warrant for alleged burglary, a class C felony, and theft, a class D felony. His bond was set at $19,000 with an optional amount of $1,900, and he was released from the Greene County Jail on Wednesday.

Marsadie J. Lewis, 22, of Jasonville, was arrested on a warrant for an alleged probation violation. As of Thursday morning no bond was set.

Linton Police February 27

The Linton Police Department’s report for Wednesday included one information only call, one custody dispute/exchange, one death investigation, two structure fires, one missing/runaway juvenile, one property damage accident, three medical/illness calls, one harassment complaint, one bomb threat, and one fingerprint for a gun permit.

Greene County Sheriff February 26

Jessica R. Huffman, 31, of Elnora, was arrested on a warrant for alleged theft, a class D felony. As of Wednesday morning she was being held without bond.

Crystal L. Wiley, 30, of Midland, was arrested on a preliminary charge of invasion of privacy, a class A misdemeanor. As of Wednesday morning she was being held without bond.

Linton Police February 26

The Linton Police Department’s report for Tuesday included four follow-up investigations, one juvenile/delinquent, one school or foot patrol, four medical/illness calls, one alarm, one VIN check, one harassment complaint, one theft/other, one miscellaneous fingerprinting, two warrant arrests, one domestic dispute, two ordinance violations, one battery, and one traffic stop.

 

Woman Arrested at Church of Christ

02-25-14.-004

A Bloomfield woman was taken into custody Monday night after an officer with the Linton Police Department was dispatched to the Church of Christ.

Officer Nick Yingling was called to the church around 8 p.m. and allegedly found Mary K. Brian, 45, fighting with multiple people inside the building. According to an LPD news release, Yingling told Brian to stop but she attempted to fight with him.

Yingling stated that he could smell the odor of alcohol on her breath, and that she told him she had been drinking whiskey. He took her into custody and transported her to the Greene County Jail.

Brian faces a preliminary charge of public intoxication, a class B misdemeanor. Her bond was set at $500 with an optional amount of $50 (ten percent) and she was released on Tuesday.

 

Greene County Sheriff February 25

Joe L. Hofmann, 35, of Jasonville, was arrested on preliminary charges of theft, a class D felony, criminal mischief, a class B misdemeanor, criminal trespass, a class A misdemeanor, and unauthorized entry of a vehicle, a class A misdemeanor. His bond is set at $9,500 with no ten percent allowed.

Troy D. White, 44, of Linton, was arrested on a preliminary charge of driving while suspended with a prior misdemeanor, a class A misdemeanor. His bond was set at $1,000 with an optional amount of $100 (ten percent) and he was released on Monday.

Mark A. Irons, 23, of Jasonville, was taken into custody for alleged failure to appear. His bond was set at $5,000 with an optional amount of $500 (ten percent).

Mary K. Brian, 45, of Bloomfield, was arrested on a preliminary charge of public intoxication, a class B misdemeanor. Her bond was set at $500 with an optional amount of $50 (ten percent) and she was released on Tuesday.

Mickey L. Tosti, 61, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for preliminary charges of three counts of dealing methamphetamine, a class A felony.

Brandon S. Missel, 30, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for a preliminary charge of failure to appear. As of Tuesday morning, he was being held without bond.

Juan R. Rodriguez, Jr., 55, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for a preliminary charge of dealing in a controlled substance, a class B felony. As of Tuesday morning, he was being held without bond.

 

Linton Police February 25

The Linton Police Department’s report for Monday included the following: One fight, one criminal mischief, one disorderly conduct, one funeral escort, two medical/illnesses, two alarms, one harassment complaint, one theft/other, one bomb threat, one welfare check/concern, one fingerprint-gun permit, and one traffic stop.

 

 

Man Accused of Theft, Unauthorized Control of a Vehicle

The Greene County Sheriff’s Department arrested Joe L. Hofmann near Jasonville on Monday morning.

Investigating Officer Deputy Jeffrey Brown took Hofman into custody on State Road 48 and County Road 1100 West. He is preliminarily charged with attempted theft, unauthorized control of a motor vehicle, criminal mischief, and trespass.

Detective James O’Malley and Jasonville Police Chief Rick Van Horn assisted.

Sheriff’s Dept. Call Logs Feb. 24

The Greene County Sheriff’s Department call logs for Feb. 21 through Feb 23 included three abandoned vehicles, three property damage accidents, one personal injury accident, two bank/residential alarms, two animal complaints, two assists to other departments, four domestic disputes, one fight in-progress, one harassment, one interview, etc., one property call, four reckless drivers, four road hazards, three suspicious vehicles/persons, two thefts, three traffic stops, and four transports.

 

Canine Veteran to Reunite with Former Partner on March 3

HarveyandJjackson1

Former Air Force Technical Sergeant Harvey Holt will finally bring his former partner home to him next week.

On Monday, March 3, Holt will travel to Andrews Air Force Base to pick up his fellow veteran– a 10-year-old Belgian Malinois named Jjackson. Holt has been trying to adopt the canine for seven years, but was told a couple of years ago that the military considered Jjackson unadoptable and that he would be euthanized upon retirement.

Last week, however, Holt received word that he could bring Jjackson home to him– as long as he could meet the requirements for Jjackson’s housing and pick him up as soon as possible. Holt also found out that Jjackson has medical issues that may require the amputation of one of his legs.

“He’s going lame and club-footed in his back right leg,” Holt explained.

The time constraints left Holt needing to gather funds and construction materials quickly, and over the weekend he reported that the community has been overwhelmingly generous in their support of Jjackson’s homecoming.

Community members have given to Jjackson’s Home for Heroes Fund at Bloomfield State Bank, and Holt said he is grateful for every donation, big or small. Cook Group, Inc. will fly Holt and several others to Andrews AFB in their private jet to pick Jjackson up, and if weather allows American Legion Riders will provide an honor escort for the canine veteran.

Sunday, Holt reported that while Jjackson still needs donations for his immediate medical issues and a few other things, the generosity of those who have helped so far has gone a long way to ensuring a smooth transition for the retired hero.

“All he really has left is to find enough money to buy, or have donated, enough pavers and labor for a 10×12 patio instead of the concrete pad [for his kennel area], since weather and time is an issue. When he gets here we can find out about his possible surgery costs. Once the pavers are in, we meet the requirements for Jjackson’s living space,” he said.

You may donate to Jjackson’s Home for Heroes Fund at any Bloomfield State Bank branch. Holt asks that you keep your deposit slip so that the money can be returned to you if it is not needed.

Offers of other types of assistance can be made by emailing Holt at jacksonh202@yahoo.com or messaging Jjackson A Hero’s Homecoming on Facebook.

Please do not contact the sheriff’s office with offers of help.

Update: 5:52 p.m., Feb. 24– Hessit Works, Inc. in Freedom has donated the necessary pavers and supplies.

Find out more about Holt and Jjackson’s Air Force careers at Local Veteran Asks for Help Bringing Former Partner Home.

Greene County Sheriff February 24

Zane Q. Polmanter, 40, of Bloomfield, was arrested on a preliminary charge of invasion of privacy, a class B misdemeanor. As of Monday morning, he is being held with no bond.

Tiffany A. Resler, 30, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for alleged check deception, a class A misdemeanor. Her bond was set at $5,000 and she paid the optional $500 (ten percent) and was released Saturday.

Kyla D. Sharp, 35, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for allegedly failing to appear for a court date. As of Monday morning, she is being held without bond.

Christopher L. Demoss, 31, of Otwell, was arrested on a warrant for a petition to revoke a suspended sentence. As of Monday morning, he is being held without bond.

Linton Police February 24

The Linton Police Department’s report for the weekend included one littering, one trespassing, one records check, one fraud, three title checks, three follow-up investigations, four information only calls, one lifting assistance, three after-hours utility calls, one criminal mischief, one utility repair, one structure fire, two personal injury accidents, two property damage accidents, seven medical/illness calls, two alarms, five animal complaints, one VIN check, two suspicious vehicles/persons, one assist to another agency, one harassment complaint, one possibly intoxicated driver, one extra patrol, one theft/other, one bicycle theft, two welfare checks/concerns, four fingerprints for gun permits, two arrests on warrants, two domestic disputes, one shoplifting, one abandoned vehicle, one community relations, and fifteen traffic stops.

Sheriff’s Dept. Call Logs Feb. 21

The Greene County Sheriff’s Department call logs for Feb. 17 through Feb. 20 included four abandoned vehicles, nine property damage accidents, one personal injury accident, four bank or residential alarms, two animal complaints, five assists to other departments, one assist to a motorist, one breaking and entering, two child neglect calls, one civil dispute, two domestic disputes, one EMS, one fight-in-progress, one fire, one harassment, one interview or etc., three cases of property damage that were not accidents, five reckless drivers, four road hazards, ten suspicious vehicles or people, three threats, six title checks, four traffic stops, ten law transports, one trash call, one unruly subject, two criminal mischief calls, three warrant services, and two welfare checks.

 

Linton Police February 21

The Linton Police Department’s report for Thursday included the following: One triple one, one fraud, two follow-up investigations, two lifting assistance requests, one juvenile/delinquent, one utility after hours, one protective order violation, one criminal mischief, one property damage accident, two medical/illnesses, one animal complaint, two theft-others, one animal debris in roadway, one fingerprint/miscellaneous, two domestic disputes, two animal canines removed, and one traffic stop.

 

Greene County Sheriff February 21

Janna A. Hineman, 24, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for a petition to revoke a suspended sentence. She is being held without bond.

 

Greene County Under Severe Thunderstorm Warning

Severe Thunderstorm Warning

Bulletin – Immediate Broadcast Requested
Severe Thunderstorm Warning
National Weather Service Indianapolis, IN
8:30 PM EST Thu Feb 20, 2014

The National Weather Service in Indianapolis has issued a Severe Thunderstorm Warning for:

  • Southwestern Brown County in South Central Indiana
  • Eastern Greene County in Southwest Indiana
  • Northwestern Jackson County in South Central Indiana
  • Northern Lawrence County in South Central Indiana
  • Monroe County in South Central Indiana
  • Southwestern Morgan County in Central Indiana
  • Southeastern Owen County in West Central Indiana

Until 9:15 PM EST

At 8:27 PM EST, a severe thunderstorm was located 11 miles east of Bloomfield, and moving northeast at 55 mph.

Hazard: 60 mph wind gusts.

Source: radar indicated.

Impact: expect damage to roofs, siding, and trees.

Locations impacted include Bloomington, Spencer, Springville, Avoca, Oolitic, Harrodsburg, McCormicks Creek State Park, Fairfax State Recreation Area, Bartlettsville, Smithville, Whitehall, Ellettsville, Stinesville, Monroe Reservoir, Indiana University, Gosport, Charles Deam Wilderness, Woodview Hills, Unionville, and Elkinsville.

Precautionary/preparedness actions: For your protection move to an interior room on the lowest floor of a building.
For more information, please visit the National Weather Service page about this Severe Thunderstorm Warning.

Tornado Warning for Eastern Greene County

Severe Weather Statement
National Weather Service Indianapolis, IN
8:20 PM EST Thu Feb 20, 2014

A Tornado Warning remains in effect for Eastern Greene and Northern Martin counties until 8:45 PM EST

At 8:17 PM EST, a severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado was located 8 miles southeast of Bloomfield, and moving northeast at 65 mph.

Hazard: tornado.

Source: radar indicated rotation.

Impact: Mobile homes will be damaged or destroyed. Damage to roofs, windows and vehicles will occur. Flying debris will be deadly to people and animals. Tree damage is likely.

Locations impacted include: Owensburg and Solsberry.

Precautionary/preparedness actions:

Take cover now. Move to an interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy building. Avoid windows. If in a mobile home, a vehicle, or outdoors, move to the closest substantial shelter and protect yourself from flying debris.

Tornadoes are difficult to see and confirm at night. Take cover now.

For more information, please visit the National Weather Service page about this Tornado Warning.

Local Veteran Asks for Help Bringing Former Partner Home

Harvey and Jackson

Former Air Force Technical Sergeant Harvey Holt, who now works as a deputy for the Greene County Sheriff’s Department, has spent the last seven years working to keep a promise he made to another veteran. Now, Holt needs the support of the community to keep that vow and bring his long-lost partner home to him.

In 2003, Holt was a K-9 handler stationed at Andrews Air Force Base. He was trying to find a dog to work with, and his first two attempts failed– one dog could only work with women and another was too old to be certified. Then he had the opportunity to work with a Belgian Malinois puppy named Jjackson, who had just finished school and arrived at the base.

Holt said it was not exactly love at first sight.

“Originally, I didn’t want him. I said he looks skinny, he looks sick,” he admitted. “But there was something about his eyes– he just had the brightest copper eyes and these big old long ears. I thought he was funny looking, but after a while of training him I knew he picked it up fast. I got him certified and I was his first certified handler.”

The pride Holt feels for his former partner is evident when he discusses Jjackson’s training and the fact that his skinny puppy became the base’s go-to dog for breaking up fights and averting trouble.

“You wouldn’t believe how hard he could hit you,” Holt marvelled. “It was always fun to watch people run and just get levelled by this little bitty dog. I think he was about 56 to 60 pounds at the time– I think he’s about 65 now and still skinny as a rail, but he’s got a lot of gray on him now.”

Holt recalled a night shift when he was bored during a training maneuver and taught Jjackson to play dead within 45 minutes. He was not satisfied with the normal version of the trick, but instead instructed Jjackson to remain on his back until Holt got down on his hands and knees, performed fake CPR on him, and then crashed his hands together and said “clear”.

“One time that bit me in the butt,” Holt laughed. “One of my security police friends knew about it and I was up at the main gate searching cars and he came up and went “bang” to the dog. Jjackson laid down in traffic, rolled over, and I had to give him CPR to get him back on his feet. That’s when I learned you don’t teach a dog any trick you don’t want everybody to see– or don’t tell anybody what you’ve taught them.”

Minor embarrassments aside, Holt and Jjackson continued training, working, and bonding during a variety of assignments including presidential security details until 2006, when Holt volunteered for a tour in Iraq. He and Jjackson were sent to Balad Air Base, north of Baghdad.

As soon as they arrived in Iraq, Holt learned that the team they were relieving had just been hit by an improvised explosive device (IED) and that he and his dog needed to head out on the next helicopter to assist the army. Holt did not even have any bullets or proper protective gear, let alone know where he was headed, and had not been in Iraq for an hour when the helicopter he and Jjackson were in was shot at.

That was the start of a deployment that changed Holt for life– and brought him so close to Jjackson that, years later, he still has trouble keeping his composure when talking about his dog.

In Iraq, Holt and Jjackson assisted many different teams, entering into most assignments without knowing the other humans they worked with or what their mission would be.

“If they wanted a dog, they got a dog,” he explained.

Their first mission involved a sweep of an abandoned school that was possibly inhabited by an insurgent.

“In the first building, after about five minutes on the ground, Jjackson found a cache of weapons inside a boys’ bathroom stall. He found a couple of machine guns, a whole bunch of ammunition and maps, and all sorts of stuff. I gave my dog a reward, searched the rest of the school, and didn’t find anything in the school or the area around it,” Holt remembered.

They then went to search the exterior of the school wall, which had a farm trailer against it. Jjackson started pulling him down the wall, and Holt said all he could think about was not wanting to step on an IED. He began stepping in every bush they passed, because he believed if the bush was alive nothing was buried there.

“He pulled me about a hundred feet down the wall and the trailer was there,” Holt recalled. “He was searching on the ground, I was watching him, and I never understood what it meant when my trainer said, ‘You need to trust your dog, trust your dog, trust your dog. If your dog shows you something out of the ordinary, trust him’. I never got that, but Jjackson pulled me to the trailer, searched the ground, and spun in a circle.”

Holt looked down at his feet and saw an IED on a trip wire that his dog had located. He and Jjackson then continued a search of the area and found a much larger IED.

The pair went on to work with everyone from the Rangers to Special Forces without ever really getting to connect with any of the Army personnel they worked with, but initially were constantly requested by units who knew the capabilities of military dogs. Then, during the second half of the deployment, things changed.

“It changed over to the 1st Cavalry Division and we had to fight to get missions,” Holt explained. “They always wanted the Army dog, whether he was the best dog for the mission or not. They did not care and they did not want Air Force with them. They felt that we shouldn’t be there.”

That left Holt with only Jjackson to talk to– they shared a bed, meals, and even went to the base theater together.

“Everything we did, it was me and him,” Holt stressed. “Bad day– me and him. The hardest days were the days we lost people on missions. We lost 26 in the six-months we were there. They were anywhere from 17 years old up.”

He said the loss he will always remember the most is that of Captain Donnie R. Belser, Jr., who headed the only team who treated Holt and Jjackson well during the latter part of their time in Iraq.

“He and his team were not like the rest of them– they treated us like royalty,” stressed Holt. “They knew that we were there to do something they had no capability of doing, and when they called for us they gave us our own room that was inside with air conditioning. They would kick people out of their rooms to give us space.”

He noted that Belser would bend over backwards for Jjackson, giving them space on Humvees instead of making the dog sit on Holt’s lap for 12 hours at a time and ensuring Jjackson got time to sleep.

“He always had a smile on his face,” Holt said of Belser. “The Army wasn’t supporting us with equipment but he got me plates for my vest, he got me ammunition if I needed it, and if I needed something for my dog he would order it and give it to me. He was one of the few people who I would let pet my dog– Jjackson would just run up to him and love on him.”

Holt credits Belser with saving his life on a mission where Belser spotted a man with a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) about six feet from Holt. Around two months later, however, Belser went on a mission and what Holt described as a one-in-a-million sniper shot took his life as he was returning to the base.

“That one really hit Jjackson and I hard,” Holt recalled. “If it wasn’t for him I would have hated life there the last half of my mission, because we were never supported. He and his team would support us no matter what, though.”

Holt said that a surprising part of Jjackson’s personality was that following the death of a service member his number one priority was no longer to find explosives, but instead to comfort the survivors.

“Against regulations, I would let him run around with all the soldiers hugging and kissing and crying on him,” Holt explained. “It was a way for them to get it out and a way for me to get it out– I hugged and cried and kissed on him a lot, too. A lot of the soldiers were very grateful for that. There was something about Jjackson. He was a meanie when he knew it was time to work, but he knew when it was time to play and love. That’s where a lot of our bond came from. He was a baby doll.”

Speaking about Jjackson’s softer nature, Holt recalled teams that made the pair sleep outside of buildings while shots were being fired at the facilities, because they were afraid of the dog.

“I remember that any time I slept out by myself, Jjackson would climb in my sleeping bag with me. He would climb in, turn around, poke his head out and we would sleep like that all night. He made sure that nobody walked up on me and nobody did anything to me. On many nights we slept that way, and that’s how we kept warm on the winter nights when it was cold out– we just used each other’s body heat,” he said.

Holt noted that besides providing comfort and saving many lives during their time in Iraq, Jjackson also went through some of the worst experiences of his life with him– including being left behind on a mission.

The team was searching a farm yard when they sent Holt and Jjackson into a field and recalled their security team without alerting Holt.

“I made my way back to the farmhouse and their trucks were gone,” Holt remembered. “I didn’t know where I was at, what unit I was with, or how to get a hold of anybody.”

He started walking down the road after about an hour-and-a-half, and found a culvert to hide in with Jjackson. Eventually, a military Humvee drove by and Holt and his dog got a ride with them.

“That team initially denied leaving us behind on the mission,” Holt stated. “The captain finally admitted he left us, but that’s one of my bad memories from Iraq– it gives me nightmares and I have separation anxiety.”

During his last mission in Iraq, Holt stopped the vehicle he was in to let Jjackson relieve himself and the Humvee behind them passed them, hit an IED, and flipped on top of their vehicle. Holt and Jjackson took shelter in a ditch, and watched their vehicle drive away. Holt said they spent an estimated 16 hours in that ditch.

“We were surrounded by dead bodies, with me laying on top of Jjackson, taking small arms fire, heavy machine gun fire, and RPGs,” he recalled. “It was just me and Jjackson in the ditch and not once did he try to get up or try to do anything but exactly what I asked him to do. He never whined, never complained, never did anything.”

After that mission, Holt received orders sending him back to the United States. They landed in New Jersey, and a trainer and a handler from Holt’s section were waiting for them.

“As I came down the ramp, they basically said, ‘This is the new handler, hand the leash over’. I refused, and was able to take him back to Andrews Air Force Base,” Holt stated. “I didn’t cry when I left, and I didn’t really cry when my mom passed away, but after we got back and they made me put my dog up we sat in the kennel for a good two hours and I just cried. That’s the last time I ever got to hold Jjackson’s leash.”

Holt said that bitter fact has haunted him for the last seven years.

He filled out paperwork to be the first person in line to adopt Jjackson upon his retirement, and then began waiting. Two years ago, at a national conference in Vincennes, sympathizers tried to surprise Holt by having Jjackson adopted to him.

“To my understanding, it got all the way up to the final signature and then they determined that he was still useful to the military and unadoptable at that time. A month and a half later I got word that they weren’t adopting him because they deemed him too aggressive and they were going to put him down. Well, that broke my heart,” Holt said, noting that the military did offer him the opportunity to say goodbye to Jjackson before he was put down.

Save-A-Vet, an organization that helps rehabilitate both human and canine veterans, became involved in Holt’s struggle. Still, a long period with no news of his dog convinced Holt that he was only waiting for Jjackson to be put down.

Tuesday, however, Holt received a message from a friend at Andrews Air Force Base, telling him to call the base kennel master.

“I hesitated for awhile, because I thought they were going to tell me Jjackson was put down and they forgot to call me, so I was expecting the worst,” Holt explained. “But I called him and he asked me if I was still interested in adopting Jjackson.”

The kennel master told Holt they had too many dogs to care for right now, and that he needs to pick Jjackson up as soon as possible.

“They said that if I don’t take him now, he’s going to go to someone who doesn’t know him or have this bond with him,” Holt said. “The problem is that right now, with two police dogs already there, I don’t have the facilities at my house that he needs. He has medical issues that they haven’t been too specific about yet. They said the vet is considering amputating one of his legs because of his issues and he also has a little bit of kennel aggressiveness, so he’s right on the line of being considered adoptable through the military.”

Holt is getting the opportunity to try to help Jjackson as a former handler, though, since the military no longer considers military dogs as equipment but instead views them as service members. The problem Holt faces is that he needs to raise money in order to pick up Jjackson on short notice.

“I need an airline ticket or a rental car to pick him up within the next week or so,” Holt explained. “He also requires a certain type of kennel. So we’re in the process of trying to raise funds for it.”

Jjackson cannot immediately be housed with Holt’s other two police dogs, but instead needs his own space to relax, recuperate, and learn to be a dog instead of a service member. He requires a 10×20 foot concrete pad with an eight-foot fence and a small kennel that is heated.

“I hate asking for help,” Holt stated, “but with this being such short notice there’s no way I can get the money I need to get this built. We’re relying on businesses and people who have construction experience or leftover construction materials to help build this and make it a nice home he deserves, not just a box outside.”

Holt added that Jjackson was bred by the military and that is the only life he has ever known, and that it is time for him to have the life he deserves. Military sources do not know how long the 10-year-old dog has to live, but Holt wants to make sure the rest of his life is as comfortable as possible.

“I remember making him a promise in Iraq that if he got me through that, I would do everything I could to bring him home. Now is my opportunity to do that, and I need help. I just want to fulfill my promise to him, so that’s why I’m asking for everyone’s help now,” he explained, stressing that he would normally find a second job to help pay Jjackson’s expenses. That is not not an option within the time constraints the military has given him, though.

Donations for Jjackson’s new life with Holt can be made at any Bloomfield State Bank branch. You may either ask for the Home for Heroes account or mention Harvey Holt’s name.  Holt asks that you keep your deposit slip so that the money can be returned to you if it is not used.

Please do not contact the sheriff’s office with offers of help.  If you would like to contact Holt, please either email him at Jjacksonh202@yahoo.com or check Jjackson A Hero’s Homecoming on Facebook.

 

Greene County Sheriff February 20

Rickey J. Moore II, 21, of Odon, was arrested on a warrant for alleged theft, a class D felony. His bond is set at $4,000 with an optional amount of $400 (ten percent).

Olivia S. Fines, 19, of Switz City, was arrested on a preliminary charge of possession of marijuana/hashish, a class A misdemeanor. Her bond was set at $1,000 with an optional amount of $100 (ten percent) and she was released on Thursday.

 

Linton Police February 20

The Linton Police Department’s report for Wednesday included one search warrant service, two information only calls, four after-hours utility calls, one custody dispute/exchange, one medical/illness call, one suspicious vehicle or person, one assist to another agency, two thefts/other, one animal/debris in roadway, three fingerprints for gun permits, one miscellaneous fingerprint, one domestic dispute, and one traffic stop.

Greene County Sheriff February 19

Angela M. Abney, 43, of Bloomfield, was arrested on a warrant for alleged disorderly conduct, a class B misdemeanor. She is being held without bond.

Michael A. Campbell, 34, of Linton, was taken into custody for a parole revocation.

Austin J. Lucas, 24, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for an alleged probation violation. He is being held without bond.

Robert L. Thomas, 43, of West Lafeyette, was arrested on a preliminary charge of criminal conversion, a class A misdemeanor. His bond was set at $5,000 with an optional amount of $500 (ten percent) and he was released on Wednesday.

Brooke A. Hamoel, 20, of Linton, was arrested on preliminary charges of dealing a synthetic drug or look-alike, a class D felony, maintaining a common nuisance, a class D felony, possession of synthetic cannabis, a class A misdemeanor, and possession of paraphernalia, a class A misdemeanor.

Robert W. Ceol, 31, of Linton, was arrested on preliminary charges of possession of a controlled substance, a class D felony, pessession of a controlled substance/subterfuge, a class D felony, dealing a synthetic drug or look-alike, a class D felony, possession of synthetic cannabis, a class A misdemeanor, maintaining a common nuisance, a class D felony, and possession of paraphernalia, a class A misdemeanor.

Ashley N. Shreve, 22, of Linton, was arrested on a warrant for allegedly operating a vehicle while intoxicated, a class D felony, and theft, a class D felony.

David L. Griffith, 38, of Mooresville, was arrested on a warrant for alleged burglary, a class C felony. He is being held without bond.

Updated: Warrant Issued after Alleged Hot Dog Theft in Bloomfield

rickey moore

An Odon man accused of stealing a hot dog from a convenience store has been arrested on a warrant.

Rickey J. Moore II, 21, allegedly went to the Picnic Basket on the night of February 10, poured a fountain drink, and pulled a hotdog out of the rotisserie. Bloomfield Deputy Marshal Marvin Holt stated in a court document that store surveillance footage then showed Moore placing the hot dog in his pocket before paying for his drink and leaving the store.

According to Holt, both he and Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Bobby Pierce recognized Moore because of prior encounters and his previous incarcerations.

Holt, Pierce, and Bloomfield Deputy Jordan Allor found the car Moore was driving at a residence near the Picnic Basket and attempted to gain entry. Holt stated that he heard a female whisper “Rickey” as he knocked on the door and that Allor looked through a window and saw a man lying on a couch in the residence, but no one answered the door.

The warrant for Moore’s arrest was issued last Friday for a preliminary charge of theft, a class D felony. As of Thursday morning, he is being held on $4,000 bond with an optional cash amount of $400 (ten percent).