Greene County Courts, February 13

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

In Re: The Marriage of Lorene M. Lawrence and Gordon W. Lawrence, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Marriage of Emberly A. Helming and David Helming, Jr., Domestic Relation

In the Matter of: Vehicle Title Request for James J. Berger, Petitioner, Miscellaneous Civil

Greene Circuit Court:

In Re: The Marriage of Teresa Lynn Galyan and Bryan Scott Galyan, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Estate of Velma O. McIntosh, Estate, Supervised

State of Indiana ex rel Nancy J. Peterson vs. Carleton W. Peterson, Reciprocal Support

In the Matter of: Vehicle Title Request for James J. Berger, Petitioner, Miscellaneous Civil

Greene County Courts, February 12

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC vs. Rebecca A. Morris, Civil Collection

Bloomfield State Bank vs. Timothy A. George, The State of Indiana, Indiana Department of Revenue, Treasurer of Greene County, Indiana, Mortgage Foreclosure

In the Matter of Vehicle title Request, Tomi L. Pierce petitioner, Miscellaneous, Civil

Greene Circuit Court:

Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC vs. Breanna D. Manley, Civil Collection

Midfirst Bank vs. Brian K. Butler, Billie Jo Butler, Occupants, Mortgage Foreclosure

Greene County Courts, February 11

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Bloomfield State Bank vs. Timothy A. George, The State of Indiana, Indiana Department of Revenue, Treasurer of Greene County, Indiana, Mortgage Foreclosure

Greene Circuit Court:

Discover Bank vs. John R. Brod, Civil Collection

In Re: The Marriage of Jenny Lynn McSweeney and Steven M. McSweeney, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Marriage of David Elliott and Christina Elliott, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Marriage of Brittany Griffin and Michael Morin, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Estate of Donna Jo Vandagrifft, Estate, Miscellaneous

Greene County Courts, February 10

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Calvalry SPV I, LLC vs. Taylor B. Gilliland, Civil Collection

Independence Place Apts a/k/a Valenti Real Estate Servs. Inc vs. Judy Riggleman, Small Claims

Four Rivers Liberty Place, LLC c/o Independence Place a/k/a Valenti Real Estate Services, Inc. vs. Brandon Buskirk and Keisha Buskirk, Small Claims

Greene Circuit Court:

Velocity Investments, LLC vs. Ralph Craig, Civil Collection

In the Matter of the Estate of Larry G. Ramsey, Deceased, Estate, Unsupervised

In Re: The Guardianship of a Minor Child, Guardianship

John D. May vs. Greene County Clerk of Courts, Indiana Public Access Counselor, Susan Fowler, Civil Plenary

Greene County Courts, February 9

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Credit Acceptance Corporation vs. Robert Dale a/k/a Robert A. Dale, Civil Collection

Midland Funding, LLC as Successor in Interest to Credit One Bank NA vs. Kirk Buckley, Civil Collection

In Re: The Marriage of Bobbie Jo Wilson and Jonathon E. Wilson, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Marriage of Lee Ann Beliles and Robert Lee Beliles, Domestic Relation

LVNV Funding, LLC vs. Lloyd Donda a/k/a Donda S. Hudson, Small Claims

Joe Hasler vs. Dodge City Homes, Inc, Small Claims

Holmes Homes, LLC vs. Rheannon M. Stalcup, Small Claims

Greene Circuit Court:

Capital One Bank (USA), N.A vs. Stella Abrams, Civil Collection

Capital One Bank (USA), N.A vs. Stella Abrams, Civil Collection

Midland Funding, LLC as Successor in interest to Credit One Bank NA vs. Anthony Ringer, Civil Collection

In Re: The Marriage of Melinda Synder and Jacob Snyder, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Estate of Virginia Morris, Estate, Miscellaneous

In the Matter of the Paternity of a Minor, Juvenile Paternity

Greene County Courts, February 6

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC vs. Jelita Abel and Velta F. Abel, Civil Collection

Credit Acceptance Corporation vs. Robert Dale a/k/a Robert A. Dale, Civil Collection

Greene Circuit Court:

In the Matter of the Unsupervised Administration of the Estate of Erma E. Worth, Deceased, Estate, Unsupervised

In the Matter of the Paternity of a Minor Child, A Child Born out of Wedlock, by Next Friend, Lois Ann Bilyeu, Petitioner vs. Brandon A. Bennett, Respondent, Juvenile Paternity

Greene County Courts, February 5

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

LVNV Funding, LLC vs. Mary L. Page, Civil Collection

James D. Dorraugh vs. Richard Bacon, Kimberley Gardner, Small Claims

Justin Arthur vs. Rebecca D. Sexton, Small Claims

Greene Circuit Court:

In Re: The Estate of Merrick T. Herakovich, Estate, Supervised

In the Matter of a Minor Child, a Child Born Out of Wedlock, by Next Friend, Kendra Lynn Bohnert, Petitioner vs. Brandon Wayne Moore, Respondent, Juvenile Paternity

In the Matter of the Paternity of , a Child Born Out of Wedlock, by Next Friend, Iris Arlene Sperling, Petitioner vs Nathan W. Parsley, Respondent, Juvenile, Paternity,

In Re: The Name Change of a Minor, Petitioner, Miscellaneous Civil

Greene County Courts, February 4

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Stephen R. Wikle vs. Nathan Michael, Small Claims

LVNV Funding, LLC vs. Mary L. Page, Civil Collection

Greene Circuit Court:

In Re: The Marriage of Jackie Samm and Mastin Samm, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Estate of Merrick T. Herakovich, Estate, Supervised

Greene County Courts, February 3

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

In Re: The Marriage of Kristina Ann Rippy and Gerald Wayne Rippy, Domestic Relation

In The Matter of the Petition for Expungement of Records of Misdemeanor Conviction of Charles K. Wallace, Miscellaneous Civil

Jeffrey T. Slaven vs. Heather N. May, Small Claims

Crowe Farms, Inc c/o Hartman Law Office, P.C. vs. Robby Isenogle and Bailey Kelly, Small Claims

Greene Circuit Court:

In Re: The Marriage of John Freeman Gentry and Christina Gentry, Domestic Relation

In Re: The Guardianship of a Minor, David Lee Boelter and Ashley Nicole Boelter, Petitioners, Guardianship

In Re: The Paternity of a Minor, Jeffrey T. Slaven, Petitioner/Father vs Heather N. May, Respondent/Mother, Juvenile Paternity

Greene County Courts, February 2

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Ausman Body Shop vs. Wetnight RV’S, Small Claims

Greene Circuit Court:

Capital One Bank (USA), N.A vs. Rhonda K. Hoover, Civil Collection

In Re: In the Matter of Name Change for DeLisa Nicole Sissman, Miscellaneous Civil

Greene County Courts, January 30

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Asset Acceptance, LLC vs. Andrea J. Gadberry, Civil Collection

James D. Dorraugh vs. Richard Bacon, Small Claims

Greene Circuit Court:

Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC vs. Russell Farris, Civil Collection

Greene County Courts, January 29

The following civil, family, and probate cases have been filed.

Greene Superior Court:

Midland Funding LLC as Successor in Interest to Bluestem Brands INC as Successor in Interest to Webbank as Issuer of Fingerhut Credit Account vs. Brenda Roach, Civil Collection

In Re: The Marriage of Victor Joe Marlowe and Melinda Sue Marlowe, Domestic Relation

James C Bowers vs. Shelly M Phipps, Small Claims

Greene Circuit Court:

Capital One Bank vs. Andrea J. Hesch, Civil Collection

In Re: The Guardianship of a Minor Child, Guardianship

In the Matter of the Paternity of a Child Born Out of Wedlock, by Next Friend, Tenisha Dawn Secrest, Petitioner vs. Alfredo Juarez, Respondent, Juvenile Paternity

Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC vs. Russell Farris, Civil Collection

Updated: Randal E. Crosley Sentenced to 81 Years

Randal Crosley

Original article posted March 4, 2:16 p.m.

On Tuesday afternoon in the Greene Superior Court, Judge Dena Martin sentenced Randal E. Crosley to 81 years in the Indiana Department of Correction.  The maximum sentence Crosley could have received was 85 years, and during the sentencing hearing Martin told him that not only was a hefty sentence appropriate, showing much leniency would endanger the community.

In February, Crosley entered a guilty plea for the murder of 19-year-old Katelyn Wolfe in June of last year.  He also admitted to conspiracy to commit murder, conspiracy to commit rape, criminal confinement with use of a vehicle, and dealing a schedule IV controlled substance.

In early December, Jordan W. Buskirk entered guilty pleas for murder, conspiracy to commit murder, conspiracy to commit rape, and criminal confinement.  Tuesday, Buskirk testified at Crosley’s sentencing hearing.

Buskirk told the court he met Crosley on a school bus in junior high, and described Crosley as being his “best friend” and “like a brother”.  He said Crosley lived with him multiple times and that they usually saw each other daily.

Crosley later spent short periods living in New York and near Indianapolis, but Buskirk stated that after he moved back from Indianapolis around a year-and-a-half ago they became close again– even working together shaping dumpster lids for Futurex for one to one-and-a-half weeks.

“It kind of cut into some drugs,” Buskirk said of the short employment.  “We were wanting to sell drugs instead of working.”

He admitted to buying synthetic marijuana in Terre Haute and then selling it, along with Crosley, over a period of around four to five months before they were arrested.  Buskirk also stated that they sold “a little real marijuana” and occasionally pills, although he added that he did not like selling pills because he had been addicted to them while working in a coal mine.

Buskirk explained that they both smoked marijuana and that they used synthetic marijuana on a daily basis.

“We’d wake up and I’d shower, go to his house, and the first thing we’d do is smoke a synthetic joint and go from there,” he recalled.

Buskirk said that while he had sold Wolfe marijuana a couple of times and “got her high” he did not know her personally, noting that he tried to hang out with her but it never really went anywhere so he gave up.

During May or June of last year, he said that he and Crosley were smoking synthetic marijuana when they started talking about finding a woman to rape and murder– something that just “popped into our heads”.  The two men later transitioned from discussing the possibility to buying items to use during the crime.  Buskirk stated that they did not have Katelyn in mind as a victim, and had talked about the possibility of targeting a homeless person in Terre Haute.

“It was a joke at first and then once we started smoking more the drug took over– for me, at least,” he explained, adding that at first he was afraid they would not get away with the crime.  But the more he smoked, the more confident he became, and eventually the pair travelled to Terre Haute to purchase items such as handcuffs, an anal plug, straps, rope, and an anchor to use in the rape and murder.

Buskirk stated they purchased a 20-pound anchor to dispose of their victim in a body of water, and recalled asking Crosley how much weight he thought they would need to hold a body down.

On June 5, Buskirk said the pair met Wolfe at a laundromat in Linton around 8 p.m. in order to sell her valium pills.  He noted that they still did not have Wolfe in mind for their crime, even when she told them she would get a hold of them if she needed more.

The men went to Terre Haute to buy more synthetic marijuana and then drove around getting high before they decided to go to a strip club.  Buskirk told the court they stopped in a Walmart to buy shirts, since they did not want to wear their work shirts to the club.  Eventually, however, they decided the strip club was a waste of money and after Crosley and Wolfe texted back and forth about another meeting they headed back to Linton to sell her more valium.

Buskirk said they began considering Wolfe as a target during that drive.

They picked her up around midnight and headed towards Midland to “country cruise” and get high.  Buskirk stated that he was driving, with Crosley in the passenger seat and Wolfe sitting in back.  He said Wolfe did not know where Crosley lived, and that they pretended they were going to pick up his wife.

He said they made three stops where he and Crosley both exited the car, “to see if we were going to do it”.  According to Buskirk, they knew they were not at the first two stops, and the third stop was not “the spot”.

Then they stopped again, and popped the trunk to access the handcuffs and duct tape.

Buskirk said he climbed on top of her in the backseat and she “seemed kind of shocked” but did not scream until Crosley opened the other car door.  He stated that Wolfe fought Crosley as he tried to pull her out of the car and began duct taping her mouth shut, eventually placing her in a chokehold.

Buskirk told the court that when Wolfe was handcuffed, with a shirt duct taped over her head, he took a couple of steps back while Crosley struck her.

‘I don’t know how many times he punched her in the face or in the head,” he said.

Next, he stated that Crosley used Wolfe’s phone to send texts and access her Facebook account, telling Buskirk that he was “making an alibi”.  Buskirk said both men worried she had texted someone about being with them, and that when they asked her if her dad knew where she was at, she nodded.

Buskirk told the court he did not believe anyone knew where she was, and stopped questioning her after asking if she was scared and being unable to understand her answer.

He said the last thing Crosley told Wolfe was that he was the bogeyman.

Buskirk then strangled her by wrapping a rope around her neck several times, “until she stopped moving”.

The murder took place on a county road that was heavily wooded on both sides, and afterwards they put Wolfe’s body in the trunk and drove around smoking synthetic marijuana, eventually stopping to retie her in a fetal position to prepare for throwing her body in the water.  At around 3 a.m. they arrived at a body of water Buskirk believed would be deep enough for their purposes.

Buskirk stated that after Wolfe’s body was removed from the trunk, Crosley kicked her down a hill and into shrubs, causing her to hit her head on something that may have been a stump.  Crosley then tossed her in the water and Buskirk used a flashlight to make sure her body was concealed.

The men went back to the car and left the area.  Buskirk said that Crosley broke Wolfe’s phone into pieces he disposed of in different locations, and burned her Sim card in Buskirk’s car.

Later, the pair sold some drugs and then stopped at a gas station to check for hair or blood in the trunk.  While there, Buskirk stated that he disposed of the shirt he was wearing and replaced it with the one he bought to visit the strip club.  Then they drove to Terre Haute to buy more synthetic marijuana.

Buskirk said they slept at some point during the day of June 6, and then went back to the lake to make sure Wolfe’s body was still submerged before driving to Terre Haute for more drugs.  Law enforcement officials and Wolfe’s father tried calling Crosley, but Buskirk told the court that Crosley was afraid to speak with them.  Crosley’s wife then called to tell him the police were at his house, so the men went to Crosley’s home.

Officers searched and then impounded Buskirk’s car, and took them to the police station.  Buskirk said he lied to Detective Sergeant Josh Goodman and Officer Paul Clark, of the Linton Police Department, about knowing Wolfe’s whereabouts.  He was then released, but the next day officers told him they had proof he had been with Crosley and Wolfe.

Buskirk asked for an attorney, and agreed to take a polygraph test on June 10.  He failed the test when he was asked if he “did anything to that woman”.  After talking to his attorney and learning Wolfe’s body had been found, he said he decided to make a confession.

“That whole weekend was a living hell for me,” Buskirk stated.

County Prosecutor Jarrod Holtsclaw then asked Buskirk about the keys to the handcuffs they used on Wolfe, and Buskirk replied that on June 6 Crosley gave him one of the two keys and told him he was keeping the other as a souvenir.  Buskirk added that he wiped the prints off his key and threw it into a lake by Crosley’s house.

Crosley’s attorney, Alan K. Baughman, requested that Buskirk explain how he protected Crosley when they became friends in the 8th grade.  Buskirk said Crosley was living with a foster family and when he got on the school bus other kids would make fun of the way the foster kids smelled, so he offered Crosley a seat next to him.

“There was stuff he didn’t really tell me until recently,” Buskirk explained of Crosley’s childhood, which he spent moving in and out of foster homes from a young age.  “He had a pretty rough time as a child.”

Buskirk later told Baughman that he wished he would have said that he did not want to kill Wolfe, or that Crosley would have changed his mind about it.  He stated that at the time he did not know what Crosley would think of him if he did not want to follow through on their plans.

LPD Detective Sergeant Josh Goodman testified that when he spoke with Crosley at the police department he asked Crosley if he had any weapons and Crosley said no, turning out his pockets and causing a handcuff key to fall out.  He said that Crosley told him the key was for handcuffs, but also said that he had met with Wolfe at 8 p.m. on the day she disappeared but had not seen her again.

Goodman explained that phone records for Crosley, Buskirk, and Wolfe showed that their phones had been together later that night and early the next day, though, and that Buskirk then admitted to picking her up a second time and dropping her off in Sullivan.  Crosley, he said, stuck to his story about only meeting up with her earlier that night.

Officers obtained video surveillance from the stores in Terre Haute where the two men bought items to use for rape and murder.

“In the video you can see them smiling, apparently having a good time,” Goodman noted of the shopping trips.

Video from the gas station they stopped at after Wolfe’s murder showed, among other things, Buskirk changing shirts and throwing the one he had been wearing away.  Later, officers discovered that the key Crosley had in his pocket fit the handcuffs on Wolfe’s body.  Wolfe’s DNA was discovered on samples of the shirt Crosley wore the night she was murdered, and on stains inside of Buskirk’s trunk.

At that point in the sentencing hearing, Wolfe’s aunt, Beth Wolfe, addressed Crosley, telling him that she had been waiting for the moment to talk to the person who murdered her niece.

“Learning about this case, the only motive I have ever heard is that you just wanted to know what it feels like to rape and murder someone,” she said.  “It just popped into your head.”

She then asked him to look her in the eye, telling Crosley that he used his hands and a rope to kill Katelyn so he could be close to her and feel her die– all because he was curious.

“Kate’s life is gone, but the rest of us have to find our way through this nightmare,” she stated, describing the need to tell Katelyn’s father when to eat and shower after his daughter was found dead.  She added that Crosley had left “a mountain” behind for Katelyn’s brothers to climb.

“I will never get to see [my husband] lift her off the ground when they hug, because she was so tiny,” Beth Wolfe told Crosley.  “We are all changed in the most profound way.”

She said it did not matter if he pled guilty or not, because it would not bring her niece back, and stressed the fact that her niece’s name was not written on the equipment they used to kill her, but that anyone’s name could have been written on it– because they were just curious.

“Did you feel powerful?” she asked.  “Did you feel invincible?  Did you feel like the bogeyman?”

She stated that she did not think he fulfilled his curiosity about raping and murdering someone because he did not get to rape Katelyn, and that she believed he was on his way to becoming a serial killer.

“Kate was a badass,” she told Crosley.  “She bit and kicked and tried to get away.”

Beth Wolfe said the only reason Crosley did not rape her niece was because Katelyn Wolfe would not let it happen, and that by denying him that Katelyn saved him from the death penalty.

“The irony of that is that while you were taking Kate’s life, she was saving yours,” she added before asking that Crosley receieve the maximum sentence the state would allow.

Baughman called Crosley’s sister to testify about his childhood, noting that the woman had tried to avoid the scrutiny of the press and the public, and that she was there because he had subpoenaed her testimony.

“It was not a good situation.  We were in and out of foster homes all the time since I can remember,” she told the court, stating that between the ages of three and 11 she was in 12 to 13 different foster homes in between brief stays with either her mother or father.

She stated that her brother’s relationship with their father was not good and that their father physically abused Crosley.  She said she remembered a time when her father picked Crosley up and threw him into a standing tool box, breaking his nose, and that life with their mother involved a lack of adequate food, multiple animals, and being forced to wear clothes with feces on them to school.  She also told the court that despite a teacher who would try to help Crosley by cleaning him up and putting clean clothes on him, he was tormented because of his living conditions.

The woman said she had no knowledge of Crosley being violent and did not believe he would ever commit another crime in the future.

Katelyn Wolfe’s father, Eric Wolfe, was the next to speak at the sentencing.  He read a statement written by his mother, which described Katelyn’s love of writing and painting before alleging that “animals do not treat their prey the way these two monsters did our Kate”.

Eric Wolfe then told Crosley that he did not see any tears out of him while he listened to Katelyn’s aunt’s statement.

“They say we’re supposed to forgive, but I won’t,” he said to the defendant, adding that he does not believe time heals all wounds.  “ I believe that we find a way to get through it, but it never heals.”

He then played a DVD slideshow featuring pictures of his daughter, which Crosley watched with apparent calm while the sounds of crying could be heard throughout the courtroom.

“It’s amazing to me that you can sit there and not cry,” Eric Wolfe told him.  “Everybody in here just loves her to death and will love her forever.”

He added that he saw no remorse from Crosley.

Judge Martin reviewed documents Baughman submitted on Crosley’s home life as a child, and then Holtsclaw gave her a list of aggravating circumstances to consider when sentencing Crosley.

Holtsclaw specified a history of criminal behavior and a violated condition of pretrial release on another matter, noting that Crosley was wanted on a warrant at the time of his arrest for Wolfe’s murder.  He stressed that the attack on Wolfe was planned for days if not weeks and that the defendant not only did not change his mind in that time period, but also used his relationship with Wolfe to lure her to her death.

Holtsclaw reminded the court that Wolfe was driven to a remote area by two drug dealers, attacked and bound, and tormented with a bogeyman comment while fighting for her life.

“It’s the worst thing I’ve had to deal with in the 16 years I’ve been a prosecutor,” he stated.

Holtsclaw said he could not give a better reason for a life sentence than Beth Wolfe did, noting that Wolfe was essentially killed for sport or entertainment and that Crosley then kept the keys to her handcuffs as a souvenir.  He lamented the fact that he did not have the power to secure the death penalty for Crosley, despite attempting to do so, and again stated that despite having plenty of time, Crosley did not change his mind about following through with Wolfe’s murder.

Holtsclaw also said that while Crosley did admit his guilt, he did not have much choice in the matter due to the amount of evidence that would have been used against him in trial.  He then asked Martin to issue Crosley the maximum penalty allowed– 85 years of imprisonment.

Baughman, however, told Martin that the age of his client, the fact that Crosley has a child, and his client’s horrendous childhood should all be mitigating factors in his sentencing.

“There were things in that home that no child should have to go through,” he stated.

He also noted that a report from the probation department contained statements proving that Crosley showed remorse, and that Crosley took responsibility for his crime by admitting his guilt instead of putting Wolfe’s family through the long ordeal of a trial.  Baughman said any delay in his client taking responsibility was due to his own duty to first investigate the case.

Baughman then told the court that Crosley’s criminal history only consisted of a misdemeanor conviction and another matter that has not resulted in a conviction at all, and that he recommended a minimum sentence for the murder count.

Martin prepared to issue Crosley’s sentence by first addressing the Wolfe family.

“Most days I love my job,” she told the group.  “Today is not one of those, because no matter what I do, I can’t bring Katelyn back.”

Martin said she was sorry for the fact that no one could bring Wolfe back to them, before explaining that the purpose of the sentencing hearing was to consider all the circumstances of the case and decide what was appropriate for sentences.

She told Crosley that while it is true he is 25 and by no means elderly, he is also not ten and was old enough to know right from wrong at the time of his crime.  As to having a child who would grow up without a father, she stated, “It’s not because of me.  It’s because of what you did.”

Martin said that while she would give him some credit for admitting his guilt, he did so knowing that the prosecutor had an awfully good case against him.

“Even a very poor childhood does not give you an excuse or validation to take a human life,” she added before telling Crosley that the mitigating factor she had the most time agreeing with was his remorse.

She told Crosley that she had been watching him during his court appearances, and that the only time she saw him shed a tear was while his sister spoke during the sentencing hearing.

“You may be feeling bad,” she said, “but I have a sneaky suspicion it’s because you’re sitting there.”

Martin also noted that he has a criminal history and was participating in drugs at the time of his arrest– recalling the fact that he seemed to be proud when admitting to dealing drugs in his initial hearing.

She stated that the circumstances and extent of the crime, involving a plan that was thought up over an extended period of time, were very important factors for her, and likened his deliberations about how to rape and kill someone to an average person considering whether they would see a movie.

“That’s just scary,” she told Crosley before adding that targeting a friend who trusted him and discarding her in a body of water he had done some research on was another big aggravating factor.

Martin called it a cold, calculated scheme, and referred to the crime as evil in nature.

“It was a heinous offense that you thought about and thought about and did and then tried to cover up,” she said.

Martin then sentenced Crosley to within four years of the maximum sentence the law would allow, adding that the community is not safe with him on the streets.

Man Allegedly Broke into CVS to Pay off Drug Debts

02-06-14.-005

A Linton man was arrested early Thursday morning, after allegedly breaking into the Linton CVS Pharmacy.

At shortly before 1 a.m., Linton dispatch received a call from the CVS Central Alarm, stating that they were currently observing a subject on camera hitting a window with a hammer.

Linton Police Department Sergeant Chad Crynes drove to CVS Pharmacy and saw that the drive through window was busted out. A hammer, a black glove, and a gray hat were on the ground. He looked in the drive through window and saw a man with a flashlight going through shelves in the pharmacy.

Crynes stated in a probable cause affidavit filed in the Greene Superior Court on Thursday that he recognized the man as 29-year-old Jamison K. Wease. Crynes said that when he asked if anyone else was in the building, Wease initially replied that someone was, but that after a brief moment he admitted that he was the only person in the pharmacy. Officers later cleared the store, and no other people were found.

Crynes ordered Wease to exit the building through the window, and then took him into custody and later interviewed him at the Linton Police Department.

Wease allegedly told Crynes that he had been going through a rough time in his life and had got himself into a situation where he owed some people for a drug debt. He said he spontaneously came up with the idea to break into CVS Pharmacy and that he felt he could repay his debt and get out of his situation by taking pills and/or narcotics.

Crynes stated that Wease said he was the only person involved and that no one else was aware of his intentions.

Wease reportedly described how he had difficulty getting the window to break and became upset, hitting the window repeatedly. He said he tried to get into the first hole he made but it was too small, so he hit the window more to make the hole larger, and also that he was only inside for about five to 10 seconds before he heard Crynes yelling at him.

Crynes said Wease told him that he knew he was going to get caught when he heard the alarm activate but that he really did not care because he wanted to get caught, since his addiction had gotten out of control and he felt the only way to fix his addiction was to get caught.

Wease is charged with burglary, a class C felony, attempted theft, a class D felony, and criminal mischief, a class A misdemeanor. His bond was set at $14,000 with an optional amount of $1,400 (ten percent).

 

Three Linton Residents Arrested on Multiple Controlled Substance Charges Related to Methamphetamine

Raul Sepulveda, Jr.

Editor’s Note: According to a booking summary report from the Greene County Sheriff’s Department, both Raul Sepulveda, Jr. and Christie Rupp are Bloomfield residents.  

A cooperative investigation between the Indiana State Police and the Linton Police Department resulted in the arrest of Raul Sepulveda Jr,33, Brandy Bailey, 36, and Christie Rupp, 30, all of Linton. All three were arrested in regards to Controlled Substance charges relating to methamphetamine.

Trooper Richard Klun, of the Indiana State Police, was assisted during the investigation by the Indiana State Police Meth Suppression Team, Linton Detective Sergeant Joshua Goodman and Officer Jason Wilson. Trooper Klun was also assisted by the Jasonville Police Department, the Worthington Police Department and the Indiana State Police Clandestine Lab Team.

Trooper Klun received information that Sepulveda, Bailey and Rupp had been involved in the purchase of precursors in regards to the manufacturing of methamphetamine. Trooper Klun conducted a follow up investigation in which he and Troopers from the Meth Suppression Team gathered evidence to support probable cause that manufacturing of methamphetamine was occurring from the residence on North West 11th Street in Linton.

A search warrant was approved by the Greene Superior Court in regards to the probable cause that was provided by the investigating officers.

When the search warrant was executed, officers found numerous items related to the manufacture of methamphetamine including precursors, reagents, equipment used to manufacture methamphetamine and other ingredients used to manufacture meth. They also located a powdery substance that field-tested positive for methamphetamine.

Sepulveda, Bailey and Rupp were all transported to, processed and lodged at the Greene County Jail where at the time of their arrest they were being held without bond.

Under the Law, criminal charges are merely accusations and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Find out more about the preliminary charges the three suspects face here.