The B-Roll, February 28-March 7, 2014

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Updated: Randal E. Crosley Sentenced to 81 Years
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Daycare Fire Claims Life of Child in Sullivan
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Indiana State Police, Linton PD Respond to Suicidal Subject, Death Investigation
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Air Force Vets Reunited at Last
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Air Force Vets Reunited at Last

Holt and Jjackson

The 7th District of the American Legion Riders and law enforcement vehicles escorted two veterans into Bloomfield on Thursday afternoon, as well-wishers waved American Flags and held up homemade signs to celebrate their arrival. The pair were returning from Andrews Air Force Base, where they had reunited after a seven-year separation.

Former Air Force K-9 handler and current Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt was thrilled to once again be holding the leash of Jjackson, his one-time military partner– although Holt might disagree with the word “partner”.

“I worked for him,” Holt stated. “I was a leash-holder and a ball-thrower, as they say. That’s all I did– he did the hard work.”

Part of Jjackson’s work included locating improvised explosive devices (IED’s) during a half-year long deployment with Holt in Iraq. As soon as the pair returned to the states, Holt was told to turn Jjackson over to his new handler. He spent the next seven years trying to be reunited with the canine hero.

Late last month, Holt finally received permission to adopt Jjackson. He had to prepare to bring him to Greene County quickly, however, which included raising funds for travel arrangements, a kennel to meet specific requirements, and medical costs he was told might include an amputation.

Thursday, Holt told the crowd that had gathered near the courthouse that being able to pick Jjackson up on such short notice was 99 percent due to Marcy Cook, who provided him with a plane ticket and a rental vehicle to drive Jjackson home in.

“She’ll never know how much it meant to me and my family for her to go above and beyond most people. I appreciate it, and if there’s ever anything I can do for you, or my family [can do for you], don’t hesitate to call. [Jjackson’s] part of your family too, now,” a tearful Holt said.

He noted that it was only Jjackson’s second day of retirement and that they have a long road to travel together, but that now that he has his dog he can focus on getting Jjackson’s medical issues treated.

Holt was asked if Jjackson remembered him when they first saw one another, and he laughed as he responded that at first it was more that he did not recognize his dog.

“Long story short, when I got out of the kennels they told me to go grab my leash and collar, and there was a handler I had seen five minutes ago with no dog who walked outside. I thought he was carrying his dog. I said, ‘Hey, that’s a pretty dog. Who is that?’ He said, ‘Uh, that’s Jjackson.’ I stopped and looked, and he’s gained about 15 pounds. It’s kind of like an old girlfriend you [haven’t] seen in years and years,” he explained.

Holt said that when Jjackson saw him, though, the dog ran straight to him and wanted loving.

“Obviously, you can see it’s like the old days,” Holt commented as Jjackson leaned against him. “He’s on me.”

His brother Marvin Holt, who serves as the Bloomfield Police Department’s Lieutenant Town Marshal, said he was glad the long wait to bring Jjackson home was over.

“Anytime it comes to talking about Jjackson, he starts to tear up a little bit. That dog is his life. You can tell he’s happy– he’s happy now,” Marvin Holt stated about his brother.

Harvey Holt’s wife Debbie agreed, noting that her husband will sleep much better at night. She also said she wanted to thank the military for finally turning Jjackson over to his former handler.

Marvin Holt, who has helped his brother for years in his battle to adopt the dog, stressed that many other people also made their reunion possible.

“Greene County and the surrounding counties have all done their part and I think it’s touched a lot of people,” he said.

Marcy Cook had originally donated a jet to fly Holt and Jjackson home on Monday, but the winter weather did not cooperate. The large welcome that was planned for that night got downsized a little when Thursday’s celebration needed to be planned at the last minute. Marvin Holt credited Terri Wilson, who sent out Facebook alerts to let people know when the veterans would arrive in Bloomfield, for the good turnout.

“I’m a big animal lover and everything the dog and Harvey have been through really touched my heart. I just thought it would be great to try to get the community together to show their support for them,” Wilson said, noting that she deals with local law enforcement officials on a regular basis due to running a convenience store in Bloomfield.

“I love Harvey and his brother, both,” she added.

Jack Bledsoe, a veteran who served in the U.S. Navy from 1951 to 1955, was also on-hand to greet Holt and Jjackson.

“I think we need to support our veterans– being one, myself,” he said. “I know about the dog who was with [Holt] over there [in Iraq], and it’s amazing.”

Charlie Whelchel, AKA Fat Man, who serves as the director for the 7th District of the American Legion Riders, explained the decision to provide Holt and Jjackson with an escort into town in three short sentences.

“That’s a veteran over there– two legs or four. He spent his time in combat and he deserves to come home just like the rest of us did. He deserves to live the rest of his life happily,” Whelchel stated.

Holt wants to make sure that Jjackson does just that, and said the dog’s main issue right now is the need for medical treatment. Wednesday, a veterinarian told him that Jjackson may not need a leg amputation, but that he still needs plenty of help to feel better again.

“He’s going to need a veterinarian orthopedic surgeon to take a look at his back legs,” Holt explained. “[The vet] said he’s in a lot of discomfort with some of the medical issues he’s had, and he’s possibly going to need his ankles and knees pinned, which will alleviate 90 percent of the pain he’s going through.”

Holt said that Jjackson, who will turn 11 on June 3, has arthritis that has caused him to walk unnaturally, resulting in a torn ligament.

Despite looming medical procedures, Holt was grateful and pleased that donations through Facebook and the Bloomfield State Bank have paid for Jjackson’s kennel, which Holt and volunteers hope to start constructing on Friday.

“He’ll have a nice home,” Holt promised, before assuring the community that he and Jjackson will soon be available to visit with them again.

“Once we get to know each other a little more, we’ll be more than willing to come out and talk to your organizations and give you a history on military working dogs in general, because there are a lot of dogs still out there working and being deployed that actually need stuff that the military unfortunately can’t really afford to give them,” he said.

If you wish to make a donation towards Jjackson’s expenses, you may give to the Jjackson’s Home for Heroes Fund at any Bloomfield State Bank branch. Holt asks that you keep your deposit slip so that the money can be returned to you if it is not needed.

Offers of other types of assistance can be made by emailing Holt at jacksonh202@yahoo.com or messaging Jjackson A Hero’s Homecoming on Facebook.

Greene County Drug Task Force Investigation Leads to Arrests in Linton

Mickey Tosti

The Linton Police Department served numerous warrants for drug-related offenses early Tuesday morning.

The arrests were due to an ongoing Greene County Drug Task Force Investigation led by Detective Joshua Goodman.

At around 12 a.m., Investigating Officer Paul Clark served Mickey L. Tosti, 61, with a warrant issued for three counts of dealing methamphetamine. According to an LPD news release, Tosti and others fled to the back of the Linton residence and attempted to destroy potential evidence. Officers entered the home to try to prevent the loss of evidence, and allegedly located numerous drug-related items in plain view.

Officers then obtained and executed a search warrant for the home.

Linton resident Brandon S. Missel, 30, was allegedly found hiding underneath the house. Missel was wanted on a warrant for dealing in a controlled substance.

55-year-old Juan R. Rodriguez, Jr. was taken into custody at Linton’s mobile manor at around 3:30 a.m. He was also wanted on a warrant for dealing in a controlled substance.

Officer Nick Yingling, Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputies Jeffrey Brown and Harvey Holt, and Jasonville Police Department Detective Ryan Van Horn assisted.

Canine Veteran to Reunite with Former Partner on March 3

HarveyandJjackson1

Former Air Force Technical Sergeant Harvey Holt will finally bring his former partner home to him next week.

On Monday, March 3, Holt will travel to Andrews Air Force Base to pick up his fellow veteran– a 10-year-old Belgian Malinois named Jjackson. Holt has been trying to adopt the canine for seven years, but was told a couple of years ago that the military considered Jjackson unadoptable and that he would be euthanized upon retirement.

Last week, however, Holt received word that he could bring Jjackson home to him– as long as he could meet the requirements for Jjackson’s housing and pick him up as soon as possible. Holt also found out that Jackson has medical issues that may require the amputation of one of his legs.

“He’s going lame and club-footed in his back right leg,” Holt explained.

The time constraints left Holt needing to gather funds and construction materials quickly, and over the weekend he reported that the community has been overwhelmingly generous in their support of Jjackson’s homecoming.

Community members have given to Jackson’s Home for Heroes Fund at Bloomfield State Bank, and Holt said he is grateful for every donation, big or small. Cook Group, Inc. will fly Holt and several others to Andrews AFB in their private jet to pick Jjackson up, and if weather allows American Legion Riders will provide an honor escort for the canine veteran.

Sunday, Holt reported that while Jjackson still needs donations for his immediate medical issues and a few other things, the generosity of those who have helped so far has gone a long way to ensuring a smooth transition for the retired hero.

“All he really has left is to find enough money to buy, or have donated, enough pavers and labor for a 10×12 patio instead of the concrete pad [for his kennel area], since weather and time is an issue. When he gets here we can find out about his possible surgery costs. Once the pavers are in, we meet the requirements for Jjackson’s living space,” he said.

You may donate to Jjackson’s Home for Heroes Fund at any Bloomfield State Bank branch. Holt asks that you keep your deposit slip so that the money can be returned to you if it is not needed.

Offers of other types of assistance can be made by emailing Holt at jacksonh202@yahoo.com or messaging Jjackson A Hero’s Homecoming on Facebook.

Please do not contact the sheriff’s office with offers of help.

Find out more about Holt and Jjackson’s Air Force careers at Local Veteran Asks for Help Bringing Former Partner Home.

Canine Veteran to Reunite with Former Partner on March 3

HarveyandJjackson1

Former Air Force Technical Sergeant Harvey Holt will finally bring his former partner home to him next week.

On Monday, March 3, Holt will travel to Andrews Air Force Base to pick up his fellow veteran– a 10-year-old Belgian Malinois named Jjackson. Holt has been trying to adopt the canine for seven years, but was told a couple of years ago that the military considered Jjackson unadoptable and that he would be euthanized upon retirement.

Last week, however, Holt received word that he could bring Jjackson home to him– as long as he could meet the requirements for Jjackson’s housing and pick him up as soon as possible. Holt also found out that Jjackson has medical issues that may require the amputation of one of his legs.

“He’s going lame and club-footed in his back right leg,” Holt explained.

The time constraints left Holt needing to gather funds and construction materials quickly, and over the weekend he reported that the community has been overwhelmingly generous in their support of Jjackson’s homecoming.

Community members have given to Jjackson’s Home for Heroes Fund at Bloomfield State Bank, and Holt said he is grateful for every donation, big or small. Cook Group, Inc. will fly Holt and several others to Andrews AFB in their private jet to pick Jjackson up, and if weather allows American Legion Riders will provide an honor escort for the canine veteran.

Sunday, Holt reported that while Jjackson still needs donations for his immediate medical issues and a few other things, the generosity of those who have helped so far has gone a long way to ensuring a smooth transition for the retired hero.

“All he really has left is to find enough money to buy, or have donated, enough pavers and labor for a 10×12 patio instead of the concrete pad [for his kennel area], since weather and time is an issue. When he gets here we can find out about his possible surgery costs. Once the pavers are in, we meet the requirements for Jjackson’s living space,” he said.

You may donate to Jjackson’s Home for Heroes Fund at any Bloomfield State Bank branch. Holt asks that you keep your deposit slip so that the money can be returned to you if it is not needed.

Offers of other types of assistance can be made by emailing Holt at jacksonh202@yahoo.com or messaging Jjackson A Hero’s Homecoming on Facebook.

Please do not contact the sheriff’s office with offers of help.

Update: 5:52 p.m., Feb. 24– Hessit Works, Inc. in Freedom has donated the necessary pavers and supplies.

Find out more about Holt and Jjackson’s Air Force careers at Local Veteran Asks for Help Bringing Former Partner Home.

The B-Roll, February 14-21, 2014

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Indiana State Police, Linton Police Department Seize over 700 Grams of Synthetic Drugs
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Northeast School Corporation: Reduction in Force
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Local Veteran Asks for Help Bringing Former Partner Home
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Marsh Madness Activities
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Local Veteran Asks for Help Bringing Former Partner Home

Harvey and Jackson

Former Air Force Technical Sergeant Harvey Holt, who now works as a deputy for the Greene County Sheriff’s Department, has spent the last seven years working to keep a promise he made to another veteran. Now, Holt needs the support of the community to keep that vow and bring his long-lost partner home to him.

In 2003, Holt was a K-9 handler stationed at Andrews Air Force Base. He was trying to find a dog to work with, and his first two attempts failed– one dog could only work with women and another was too old to be certified. Then he had the opportunity to work with a Belgian Malinois puppy named Jjackson, who had just finished school and arrived at the base.

Holt said it was not exactly love at first sight.

“Originally, I didn’t want him. I said he looks skinny, he looks sick,” he admitted. “But there was something about his eyes– he just had the brightest copper eyes and these big old long ears. I thought he was funny looking, but after a while of training him I knew he picked it up fast. I got him certified and I was his first certified handler.”

The pride Holt feels for his former partner is evident when he discusses Jjackson’s training and the fact that his skinny puppy became the base’s go-to dog for breaking up fights and averting trouble.

“You wouldn’t believe how hard he could hit you,” Holt marvelled. “It was always fun to watch people run and just get levelled by this little bitty dog. I think he was about 56 to 60 pounds at the time– I think he’s about 65 now and still skinny as a rail, but he’s got a lot of gray on him now.”

Holt recalled a night shift when he was bored during a training maneuver and taught Jjackson to play dead within 45 minutes. He was not satisfied with the normal version of the trick, but instead instructed Jjackson to remain on his back until Holt got down on his hands and knees, performed fake CPR on him, and then crashed his hands together and said “clear”.

“One time that bit me in the butt,” Holt laughed. “One of my security police friends knew about it and I was up at the main gate searching cars and he came up and went “bang” to the dog. Jjackson laid down in traffic, rolled over, and I had to give him CPR to get him back on his feet. That’s when I learned you don’t teach a dog any trick you don’t want everybody to see– or don’t tell anybody what you’ve taught them.”

Minor embarrassments aside, Holt and Jjackson continued training, working, and bonding during a variety of assignments including presidential security details until 2006, when Holt volunteered for a tour in Iraq. He and Jjackson were sent to Balad Air Base, north of Baghdad.

As soon as they arrived in Iraq, Holt learned that the team they were relieving had just been hit by an improvised explosive device (IED) and that he and his dog needed to head out on the next helicopter to assist the army. Holt did not even have any bullets or proper protective gear, let alone know where he was headed, and had not been in Iraq for an hour when the helicopter he and Jjackson were in was shot at.

That was the start of a deployment that changed Holt for life– and brought him so close to Jjackson that, years later, he still has trouble keeping his composure when talking about his dog.

In Iraq, Holt and Jjackson assisted many different teams, entering into most assignments without knowing the other humans they worked with or what their mission would be.

“If they wanted a dog, they got a dog,” he explained.

Their first mission involved a sweep of an abandoned school that was possibly inhabited by an insurgent.

“In the first building, after about five minutes on the ground, Jjackson found a cache of weapons inside a boys’ bathroom stall. He found a couple of machine guns, a whole bunch of ammunition and maps, and all sorts of stuff. I gave my dog a reward, searched the rest of the school, and didn’t find anything in the school or the area around it,” Holt remembered.

They then went to search the exterior of the school wall, which had a farm trailer against it. Jjackson started pulling him down the wall, and Holt said all he could think about was not wanting to step on an IED. He began stepping in every bush they passed, because he believed if the bush was alive nothing was buried there.

“He pulled me about a hundred feet down the wall and the trailer was there,” Holt recalled. “He was searching on the ground, I was watching him, and I never understood what it meant when my trainer said, ‘You need to trust your dog, trust your dog, trust your dog. If your dog shows you something out of the ordinary, trust him’. I never got that, but Jjackson pulled me to the trailer, searched the ground, and spun in a circle.”

Holt looked down at his feet and saw an IED on a trip wire that his dog had located. He and Jjackson then continued a search of the area and found a much larger IED.

The pair went on to work with everyone from the Rangers to Special Forces without ever really getting to connect with any of the Army personnel they worked with, but initially were constantly requested by units who knew the capabilities of military dogs. Then, during the second half of the deployment, things changed.

“It changed over to the 1st Cavalry Division and we had to fight to get missions,” Holt explained. “They always wanted the Army dog, whether he was the best dog for the mission or not. They did not care and they did not want Air Force with them. They felt that we shouldn’t be there.”

That left Holt with only Jjackson to talk to– they shared a bed, meals, and even went to the base theater together.

“Everything we did, it was me and him,” Holt stressed. “Bad day– me and him. The hardest days were the days we lost people on missions. We lost 26 in the six-months we were there. They were anywhere from 17 years old up.”

He said the loss he will always remember the most is that of Captain Donnie R. Belser, Jr., who headed the only team who treated Holt and Jjackson well during the latter part of their time in Iraq.

“He and his team were not like the rest of them– they treated us like royalty,” stressed Holt. “They knew that we were there to do something they had no capability of doing, and when they called for us they gave us our own room that was inside with air conditioning. They would kick people out of their rooms to give us space.”

He noted that Belser would bend over backwards for Jjackson, giving them space on Humvees instead of making the dog sit on Holt’s lap for 12 hours at a time and ensuring Jjackson got time to sleep.

“He always had a smile on his face,” Holt said of Belser. “The Army wasn’t supporting us with equipment but he got me plates for my vest, he got me ammunition if I needed it, and if I needed something for my dog he would order it and give it to me. He was one of the few people who I would let pet my dog– Jjackson would just run up to him and love on him.”

Holt credits Belser with saving his life on a mission where Belser spotted a man with a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) about six feet from Holt. Around two months later, however, Belser went on a mission and what Holt described as a one-in-a-million sniper shot took his life as he was returning to the base.

“That one really hit Jjackson and I hard,” Holt recalled. “If it wasn’t for him I would have hated life there the last half of my mission, because we were never supported. He and his team would support us no matter what, though.”

Holt said that a surprising part of Jjackson’s personality was that following the death of a service member his number one priority was no longer to find explosives, but instead to comfort the survivors.

“Against regulations, I would let him run around with all the soldiers hugging and kissing and crying on him,” Holt explained. “It was a way for them to get it out and a way for me to get it out– I hugged and cried and kissed on him a lot, too. A lot of the soldiers were very grateful for that. There was something about Jjackson. He was a meanie when he knew it was time to work, but he knew when it was time to play and love. That’s where a lot of our bond came from. He was a baby doll.”

Speaking about Jjackson’s softer nature, Holt recalled teams that made the pair sleep outside of buildings while shots were being fired at the facilities, because they were afraid of the dog.

“I remember that any time I slept out by myself, Jjackson would climb in my sleeping bag with me. He would climb in, turn around, poke his head out and we would sleep like that all night. He made sure that nobody walked up on me and nobody did anything to me. On many nights we slept that way, and that’s how we kept warm on the winter nights when it was cold out– we just used each other’s body heat,” he said.

Holt noted that besides providing comfort and saving many lives during their time in Iraq, Jjackson also went through some of the worst experiences of his life with him– including being left behind on a mission.

The team was searching a farm yard when they sent Holt and Jjackson into a field and recalled their security team without alerting Holt.

“I made my way back to the farmhouse and their trucks were gone,” Holt remembered. “I didn’t know where I was at, what unit I was with, or how to get a hold of anybody.”

He started walking down the road after about an hour-and-a-half, and found a culvert to hide in with Jjackson. Eventually, a military Humvee drove by and Holt and his dog got a ride with them.

“That team initially denied leaving us behind on the mission,” Holt stated. “The captain finally admitted he left us, but that’s one of my bad memories from Iraq– it gives me nightmares and I have separation anxiety.”

During his last mission in Iraq, Holt stopped the vehicle he was in to let Jjackson relieve himself and the Humvee behind them passed them, hit an IED, and flipped on top of their vehicle. Holt and Jjackson took shelter in a ditch, and watched their vehicle drive away. Holt said they spent an estimated 16 hours in that ditch.

“We were surrounded by dead bodies, with me laying on top of Jjackson, taking small arms fire, heavy machine gun fire, and RPGs,” he recalled. “It was just me and Jjackson in the ditch and not once did he try to get up or try to do anything but exactly what I asked him to do. He never whined, never complained, never did anything.”

After that mission, Holt received orders sending him back to the United States. They landed in New Jersey, and a trainer and a handler from Holt’s section were waiting for them.

“As I came down the ramp, they basically said, ‘This is the new handler, hand the leash over’. I refused, and was able to take him back to Andrews Air Force Base,” Holt stated. “I didn’t cry when I left, and I didn’t really cry when my mom passed away, but after we got back and they made me put my dog up we sat in the kennel for a good two hours and I just cried. That’s the last time I ever got to hold Jjackson’s leash.”

Holt said that bitter fact has haunted him for the last seven years.

He filled out paperwork to be the first person in line to adopt Jjackson upon his retirement, and then began waiting. Two years ago, at a national conference in Vincennes, sympathizers tried to surprise Holt by having Jjackson adopted to him.

“To my understanding, it got all the way up to the final signature and then they determined that he was still useful to the military and unadoptable at that time. A month and a half later I got word that they weren’t adopting him because they deemed him too aggressive and they were going to put him down. Well, that broke my heart,” Holt said, noting that the military did offer him the opportunity to say goodbye to Jjackson before he was put down.

Save-A-Vet, an organization that helps rehabilitate both human and canine veterans, became involved in Holt’s struggle. Still, a long period with no news of his dog convinced Holt that he was only waiting for Jjackson to be put down.

Tuesday, however, Holt received a message from a friend at Andrews Air Force Base, telling him to call the base kennel master.

“I hesitated for awhile, because I thought they were going to tell me Jjackson was put down and they forgot to call me, so I was expecting the worst,” Holt explained. “But I called him and he asked me if I was still interested in adopting Jjackson.”

The kennel master told Holt they had too many dogs to care for right now, and that he needs to pick Jjackson up as soon as possible.

“They said that if I don’t take him now, he’s going to go to someone who doesn’t know him or have this bond with him,” Holt said. “The problem is that right now, with two police dogs already there, I don’t have the facilities at my house that he needs. He has medical issues that they haven’t been too specific about yet. They said the vet is considering amputating one of his legs because of his issues and he also has a little bit of kennel aggressiveness, so he’s right on the line of being considered adoptable through the military.”

Holt is getting the opportunity to try to help Jjackson as a former handler, though, since the military no longer considers military dogs as equipment but instead views them as service members. The problem Holt faces is that he needs to raise money in order to pick up Jjackson on short notice.

“I need an airline ticket or a rental car to pick him up within the next week or so,” Holt explained. “He also requires a certain type of kennel. So we’re in the process of trying to raise funds for it.”

Jjackson cannot immediately be housed with Holt’s other two police dogs, but instead needs his own space to relax, recuperate, and learn to be a dog instead of a service member. He requires a 10×20 foot concrete pad with an eight-foot fence and a small kennel that is heated.

“I hate asking for help,” Holt stated, “but with this being such short notice there’s no way I can get the money I need to get this built. We’re relying on businesses and people who have construction experience or leftover construction materials to help build this and make it a nice home he deserves, not just a box outside.”

Holt added that Jjackson was bred by the military and that is the only life he has ever known, and that it is time for him to have the life he deserves. Military sources do not know how long the 10-year-old dog has to live, but Holt wants to make sure the rest of his life is as comfortable as possible.

“I remember making him a promise in Iraq that if he got me through that, I would do everything I could to bring him home. Now is my opportunity to do that, and I need help. I just want to fulfill my promise to him, so that’s why I’m asking for everyone’s help now,” he explained, stressing that he would normally find a second job to help pay Jjackson’s expenses. That is not not an option within the time constraints the military has given him, though.

Donations for Jjackson’s new life with Holt can be made at any Bloomfield State Bank branch. You may either ask for the Home for Heroes account or mention Harvey Holt’s name.  Holt asks that you keep your deposit slip so that the money can be returned to you if it is not used.

Please do not contact the sheriff’s office with offers of help.  If you would like to contact Holt, please either email him at Jjacksonh202@yahoo.com or check Jjackson A Hero’s Homecoming on Facebook.

 

Odon Woman Charged with Residential Entry, Disorderly Conduct

Christy Smith

Christy N. Smith, 28, is accused of entering a home without permission.

Late last Wednesday night, Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Jeffrey Brown responded to a report of a large, multi-party fight at a residence in Bloomfield. Brown was assisted by Deputy Harvey Holt, Bloomfield Police Department Lieutenant Marvin Holt, and Indiana State Police Trooper Richard Klun.

According to a probable cause affidavit, when Brown arrived at the scene he found three people in a pickup truck in the driveway and saw several people run inside the residence. One of the vehicle’s occupants, Smith, was holding her small daughter.

Brown had all parties enter the residence in order to get the child out of the cold, and Smith allegedly began yelling, cursing, making threats, and coercing others to fight her.

The owner of the residence told Brown that Smith came to the house uninvited, unwelcome, and unannounced, and that she took her daughter. According to the owner, Smith was still married to his son but they were separated with no custodial agreement in place and Smith had never resided at his home. He stated that he was playing cards with other people when someone ran in and said Smith had the child and everyone ran outside where a member of the group removed the keys from the pickup and called the police.

According to the court document, the child’s father showed Brown a text message he sent Smith earlier that day, telling her she was not allowed at the residence. He reportedly said that after Smith took the child to the truck he stood behind the vehicle to prevent them from leaving while a male in the vehicle revved the motor in an attempt to scare him from behind the truck. Brown stated that the man’s hand was bleeding, and that although he did not remember how he was injured he said he beat on the driver’s side of the truck with his hands and elbow.

Brown observed several significant dents to the side of the vehicle.

The man who drove Smith to the residence to pick up her daughter allegedly told Brown he was unaware that Smith was not supposed to be there. He said that shortly after Smith came out to the vehicle with the child she was followed by everyone else, including the child’s father who got behind the truck and then started pounding and beating on the driver’s side. The man said he locked all the doors to avoid a fight but a door got unlocked and the child’s father struck him in the face, causing pain and swelling.

Smith explained to Brown that she had three children with her husband, and that she was not living with him. Brown stated that Smith told him she knocked on the door and went inside, and that although no one let her in that was the way it worked. She allegedly added that no one had told her she was not allowed at the residence.

A woman who told Brown she was the babysitter for the kids said she and Smith knocked on the door, opened the door, grabbed the child, and left.

Deputy Harvey Holt interviewed three children and one adult, and reported to Brown that none of them heard a knock or let Smith in.

Brown placed Smith under arrest and Klun took her to the Greene County Jail without further incident.

Smith is charged with disorderly conduct, a class B misdemeanor, and residential entry, a class D felony.

Man Allegedly Tried to Take One More Pill before Entering Custody

jeffrey allen

A Linton resident’s alleged erratic driving ended in his arrest early Tuesday morning.

At about 2:36 a.m., Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt was driving east on State Road 54 West in Linton when he saw a red GMC pickup exit the parking lot of the Fast Max Fuel Station at the intersection of 8th Street SW. According to a probable cause affidavit filed on Thursday, Holt watched a van brake hard to avoid striking the truck and then followed the van and pickup.

The truck allegedly began driving halfway in the middle turn lane, and when Holt initiated a traffic stop it slowed but did not pull over. Holt stated that as the vehicle drove about three more blocks the driver was adjusting something in the cab. The truck turned north onto 4th Street NE, slowing several times only to speed up again, before the driver pulled over adjacent to Wendy’s.

Holt noted that the driver did not signal when he pulled over and also that he hit the curb and drove up onto it before he stopped. At that point, Holt called the Linton Police Department for assistance.

Holt stated that the driver, 29-year-old Jeffrey L. Allen, was looking around his cab area and that after he knocked on Allen’s window, Allen started reaching around his waist and console area. He noted that Allen’s response to questions was delayed and he had bloodshot eyes and dilated pupils. Holt also said he noticed a slight odor of alcohol and saw several open and unopened beer cans in the cab area of the truck, including an open can in the center console.

Holt alleged that Allen had difficulty opening his wallet, and that after several attempts to retrieve his driver’s license he pulled it out, started at it, and then placed it back in his wallet.

LPD Officer Kent Medlock arrived on scene and Holt stated in the court document that he saw Allen tucking something under his right leg, and that Medlock informed him the driver had pills underneath his leg.

Holt then allegedly told Allen that they saw the pills and ordered him to exit the vehicle, but he said that Allen just turned and stared at him. Medlock said something Holt could not hear, and Holt stated that when he tuned towards Medlock, Allen placed something in his mouth and tried to swallow it.

Holt then opened the door and told Allen to exit the vehicle and spit the item out, but Allen allegedly grabbed the steering wheel so that Holt could not get him out of the pickup truck. Holt said he grabbed Allen and repeated his order to spit the item out several times, but that eventually Officers Medlock and Tom Jerrels helped him remove Allen from the vehicle, at which point Allen spit a blue pill out.

Holt stated that Medlock found an unlabeled pill bottle with a missing top in plain view, and that when asked why he tried to swallow a pill Allen reportedly stated that he figured he was going to jail so he might as well take another pill.

Allen allegedly told Holt that he found the pill bottle on the curb and did not know what any of the pills were.

Holt took Allen to the sheriff’s department for field sobriety testing and noted that while he was on the way, Jerrels informed him that he found the pill Allen spit out, rolling papers, and a rolled cigarette containing an unknown green plant-like material. The pill was later identified as Acetaminophen and Hydrocodone, a schedule 3 controlled substance.

Holt noted that Allen said he wished Holt would let him smoke one more before he went to jail, and then added that he was kidding.

At the sheriff’s department, Allen refused to take field sobriety tests and a chemical test. Jail Officer Steve Dobson searched Allen and reportedly discovered a pill later identified as Alprazolam, a schedule 4 controlled substance, in his front pants pocket and a bag of what Holt believed to be synthetic cannabinoids inside his boot.

The Greene County Circuit Court issued a warrant for a blood draw, which Greene County Ambulance Paramedic Wendi Rogers administered.

Holt said Allen refused to answer questions, but that when he was told he would be charged with each different pill he stated that some of the pills were the same just from different companies, which contradicted his earlier statement that he did not know anything about them.

The pill bottle allegedly contained more than 40 pills of various types of controlled substances.

Allen is charged with possession of a controlled substance, a class D felony, resisting law enforcement, a class A misdemeanor, operating a vehicle while intoxicated and endangering a person, a class A misdemeanor, and operating a vehicle while intoxicated, a class C misdemeanor.

 

Guns, Drugs Lead to Criminal Charges in Lyons

01-28-14_arrest-002

As part of an ongoing, multi-agency criminal investigation by the Linton Police Department, the Greene County Sheriff’s Department, and the Lyons Police Department, a search warrant was issued on Monday for the residence of Jonathan K. Quillen, 27, of Lyons.

Officers seized 19 bags of what they believe to be marijuana, numerous bags of various types of prescription pills, digital scales, and ledgers.

According to an LPD news release, there were also three loaded handguns at the residence, two of which were determined to be stolen.

Quillen was not at the residence when the search warrant was executed, but Linton Detective Sergeant Josh Goodman and Lyons Marshal Ron Sparks found him hiding at a different residence later on Monday. Quillen was arrested and booked into the Greene County Jail.

Information from the Crime Stoppers Tip Line helped lead to this arrest.

Quillen is preliminarily charged with two counts of dealing in a schedule II controlled substance, a class B felony, two counts of dealing in a schedule IV controlled substance, a class C felony, and one count each possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana over 30 grams, receiving stolen property, and maintaining a common nuisance, all class D felonies.

This investigation is ongoing, and Investigating Officer Goodman has been assisted by Sparks, Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt, and members of the Greene County Drug Task Force including the Jasonville Police Department and Indiana State Police.

 

 

Solsberry Man Found Hiding under Child’s Mattress after Allegedly Battering Woman

Thomas Foerster

On November 27th at about 10:32 p.m., fire and EMS personnel responded to a residence in Solsberry after a man called to report that a woman possibly had a broken rib and was experiencing pain in her lower back. According to a probable cause affidavit filed Wednesday, the woman’s moaning could be heard in the background during the call. The male identified himself as Thomas Doe over the phone.

Fire personnel arrived and the woman told them she had been battered and the man was somewhere in the back of the house, and the personnel requested assistance from law enforcement. Medical personnel said the male was inside the residence with a child.

Bloomfield Police Department Deputy Marshal Marvin Holt and Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Jeff Payton found Thomas R. Foerster II, 38, hiding under a mattress in the child’s bedroom.

Foerster was allegedly uncooperative and a brief physical altercation occurred as Holt and Payton tried to detain him. He refused to place his hands behind his back or roll over, and tried to pull away when Holt was handcuffing him.

The woman was transported to Bloomington for medical care, and medical personnel stated that she may have a broken rib.

At about 10:55 p.m. Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt was sent to the residence to complete the battery investigation. Foerster told him no argument had occurred between him and the woman that night and that he never touched her, and when Holt asked how the woman was hurt Foerster replied that she was involved in an accident before that night. He said he did not know how long ago the accident occurred and that it was not reported to the police.

Foerster also said he had a couple of mixed drinks with vodka and that the woman had drank a couple of beers. When Holt inquired about why he was hiding under the bed, Foerster did not answer.

Holt spoke with the 6-year-old child who was present during the incident. The child said Foerster had yelled at the woman over a phone and then got mad and pushed her down in the kitchen area. He also told Holt that he thought the woman’s head was broken but could not tell him why he thought that.

The boy reported that the woman tried to call for help but Foerster took the phone from her and that Foerster then called for an ambulance. The child stated that when the ambulance arrived Foerster ran into his bedroom and hid. Holt asked why Foerster hid and the child said because he did something bad.

Holt spoke with the woman at around 1:30 a.m. on November 28th, and she said that she and Foerster got into a verbal dispute over her phone when he wanted to see her phone while she was texting her cousin to pick her up because Foerster was getting agitated after drinking. She told Holt that Foerster grabbed her around the shoulder area and pushed her down, then climbed on top of her and placed his forearm around her collar bone area.

The woman said Foerster was not choking her, and that she believed that while he was on top of her his knee was on her rib area, which caused her pain in her chest and made her unable to breathe. She added that it was possible she could not breathe because she was panicking, and that she could not remember all of the assault because it happened so fast.

The woman stated that he was on top of her for about ten minutes and that after he took her phone she asked him to call for an ambulance because her ribs were broken. She said she told Foerster that if he called an ambulance she would say that she fell down, and that he called for help while she was on the floor.

When the ambulance arrived, Foerster allegedly said he was going to jail and ran into the child’s bedroom. The woman told the ambulance service he was in the bedroom and that he beat her.

She told Holt that she had a couple of beers earlier in the day and that Foerster drank most of a large bottle of vodka and juice, and Holt saw three empty beer cans and a large bottle of vodka that was only about 1/3 full. He also observed a red scrape on the woman’s left elbow that appeared to be recent.

Foerster is charged with resisting law enforcement, a class A misdemeanor, and domestic battery committed in the presence of a child less than 16, a class D felony.

Local Law Enforcement, Medical Personnel Support Ending Violence Against Women

Jeanette Walker ties a white ribbon on Greene County Sheriff's Department Deputy Harvey Holt's vehicle

You may notice a new addition to many law enforcement vehicles soon—white ribbons tied to the antennas.

The White Ribbon Campaign symbolizes a man’s pledge to never commit, condone, or remain silent about violence against women. More than 50 countries now participate in 16 days of opposing violence against women, from White Ribbon Day on November 25th through December 10th.

“It’s mainly because a lot of males feel like they’re left out of a lot of our campaigns, so this in particular is to recognize males and thank them for opposing violence against women,” explained Middle Way House Women’s Advocate Jeanette Walker. “Our particular region wanted to recognize law enforcement officers and medical professionals that support ending violence against women.”

The Greene County Sheriff’s Department, Bloomfield Police Department, and Linton Police Department are all participating. Walker noted that tying the ribbons to ambulances can cause problems so many medical professionals will be wearing ribbons on their clothing.

Men may help support the White Ribbon Campaign by wearing a ribbon, encouraging others to wear ribbons, and supporting men who are caring and respectful towards women.

 

Man Charged with Multiple Crimes Allegedly Blacks Out When Angry

Shane Goodwill

A charge of invasion of privacy- violating a no contact order in pretrial release or diversion, a class A misdemeanor, has been filed against Shane M. Goodwill, 19, of Linton.

On November 15th, Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt went to Goodwill’s residence to serve a warrant and found another man was present with Goodwill. Holt knew that Goodwill was issued a no contact order that prevented him from having any direct or indirect contact with that man. According to a probable cause affidavit filed November 18th, both men had been told that a no contact order was in effect between them on November 10th.

The warrant Holt was serving was for intimidation with a deadly weapon, a class C felony, and criminal mischief, a class B misdemeanor. These charges are from an incident that occurred on November 10th, when Holt was dispatched to a residence in Linton at around 9 p.m.

When Holt arrived Goodwill told him he was wrestling with his nephew when his neighbor, who is 14 years old, told him to stop. He stated that he blacked out after he got mad, and informed Holt that he told the boy not to tell him what to do with his nephew, punched the wall, and left. Goodwill said he got into another verbal dispute with the neighbor a short time later and when the boy got in his face he went into the kitchen, grabbed a knife from the sink area, put it to the neighbor’s throat, and threatened to kill him.

Goodwill demonstrated to Holt that he held the knife about a foot away from the boy’s throat, and said the juvenile never hit him or hurt him in any way.

The juvenile said when he saw Goodwill wresting with his four-year-old nephew he believed Goodwill was being too aggressive and hurting the boy. He stated that when he asked Goodwill to stop Goodwill punched a hole in the wall, kicked a cedar chest and walked out, then returned about a half an hour later and apologized.

The juvenile said Goodwill then persisted in pushing him and when he would not stop the juvenile punched him in the stomach, but not enough to hurt him. He stated that Goodwill became angry again, grabbed a knife from the kitchen, put the knife against his throat, and said he would kill him.

The neighbor said that at that point another man walked in, pushed Goodwill away, and took the knife from him. Holt asked the juvenile to show him where the knife was on his throat and there was a straight line on the part he indicated, but the juvenile believed the mark had always been there.

The man who took the knife from Goodwill said the knife was actually touching the juvenile’s neck.

On April 28th of this year, Holt was dispatched to a fight-in-progress involving Goodwill. When he arrived he saw that one man present was cut on the forehead and bleeding. When Holt asked Goodwill what happened he said he backhanded the other man. He stated that they argued over a basketball video game and he blacked out when the other man pointed in his face and touched his cheek.

Goodwill also said he punched the man several times and choked him.

The other man stated that a three-year-old was also in the room, and that Goodwill pushed the child down. He added that he did not believe Goodwill tried to hurt the boy, but when Goodwill would not apologize to the child he got in Goodwill’s face and pointed at him. He said that when he barely touched Goodwill’s cheek, Goodwill hit him several times and choked him.

For that incident, Goodwill is charged with battery resulting in bodily injury, a class A misdemeanor, and the case is still pending.

Correction: November 20, 2013

This article previously listed an incorrect age for Shane M. Goodwill.

 

Woman Arrested after Ramming Vehicle into Residence

Cheyenne Riley

Early Saturday morning, Cheyenne Riley was arrested for operating a vehicle while intoxicated and criminal mischief.

According to a release by Investigating Officer Deputy Jeffrey Brown, of the Greene County Sheriff’s Department, officers were dispatched to a Linton residence just before 2 a.m. They found Riley ramming her vehicle into the residence, and after Brown noticed she smelled strongly of alcohol he administered a field sobriety test as well as further testing that determined Riley had a BAC of .23.

Deputy Harvey Holt and Jasonville Police Department Officer Ryan Van Horn assisted at the scene.

 

Two Bloomfield Residents Charged with Theft

Samuel Summerville

Samuel E. Summerville, 24, and Jessica A. Purtlebaugh, 27, were arrested Saturday on warrants issued on October 24th.

The couple is accused of stealing batteries from tractors in a barn on private property. The batteries were last seen on the night of October 13th, and on the evening of October 14th the owner of the tractors noticed the battery cables had been cut and the batteries were gone.

According to a probable cause affidavit, the victim told Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt that he thought Summerville had stolen the batteries because Summerville had stolen things in the past. On October 16th, Holt learned that two people, allegedly including Summerville, had sold three batteries to J&M Salvage for a total of $27 on October 15th. The cables to the batteries appeared to have been recently cut, and they were similar to the ones that had been stolen.

An employee at J&M Salvage also told Holt that Summerville had been accompanied by a small female who stayed in the car during the transaction.

Holt and Deputy Greg Flinn went to Summerville’s residence and asked Summerville and his fiancé, Purtlebaugh, to go to the sheriff’s department for interviews. Both suspects consented, and during the interviews Summerville initially denied taking the batteries but then admitted to the theft. He said he came up with the idea to get extra money so his fiancé could see her kids.

Summerville explained that Purtlebaugh followed him to the barn and that although he did not tell her where they were heading it was his intention to steal the batteries. He said Purtlebaugh held his phone while he cut batteries from the tractors with bolt cutters he brought from home, and also stated that Purtlebaugh carried one of the batteries when they left.

Summerville told Holt that after selling the batteries for $27 he used the money for food and gas so his fiancé could visit her kids.

After the interviews, the couple showed Holt the bolt cutters they used, which had fresh scratches on the blade from recent use.

Summerville and Purtlebaugh are both charged with theft, a class D felony, and Summerville is also charged with criminal mischief, a class B misdemeanor.

 

No Injuries Reported in Two-Vehicle Accident North of Bloomfield

Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt responded to a two-vehicle accident on East Kelly Branch Road, north of Wilke School Road, on Saturday just before 6 p.m.

Sixteen-year-old Bloomfield resident Taylor Urban was driving a 1999 Pontiac Grand Prix west on Kelly Branch Road when she saw a vehicle approaching and tried to slow down and pull towards the right side of the road. Urban went into a skid and slid down a gravel hill, causing her vehicle to swerve.

Tina Walls, 47, of Solsberry, saw Urban lose control and attempted to drive her 1992 Ford F150 into the ditch to avoid Urban’s vehicle. Urban hit the Ford behind the driver’s side door and rear fender area.

The Grand Prix’s front grill, bumper, and headlights were damaged and the F150 was disabled and towed from the scene.

No injuries were reported.

 

Car Strikes Utility Trailer in Solsberry

Dianna Cooley, 67, of Bloomington, drove her 2000 Toyota Camry into a utility trailer on Saturday afternoon.

Cooley was travelling south on North State Road 45, south of Timber Trace Drive in Solsberry, when the accident occurred around 3 p.m.

According to a release written by Greene County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Harvey Holt, Cooley said she became tired while she was driving then ran off the west side of the road and struck the utility trailer.

The collision caused minor damage to the trailer’s rear right fender and taillight, and also knocked the trailer off its hitch stand. The trailer’s hitch then hit a car parked adjacent to it, causing minor damage to the car’s front bumper.

No injuries were reported.

Both the trailer and the vehicle the trailer’s hitch struck are owned by Lee Ann Aldridge of Solsberry.