Breast Cancer Awareness: Self Care and a Mammogram

We are all fighting cancer every day. Everything we do impacts whether or not our bodies can kill rogue cells that want to grow out of control. That includes what we eat – lots of fresh, local, colorful fruits and veggies are a great place to start – and how much we move – even just a little goes a long way – and even how we rest. Are you taking time for yourself? Sleeping and investing in the relationships you need to feel supported?

Photo Credit 

No one has it all together, and none of us are going to eat right, exercise, and rest up as much as we need. That’s why it is still important to get those annual health screenings and catch disease early. All women should perform regular, careful, monthly self-breast examinations.(You can learn more about how to perform those in our previous post, “Breast Cancer Awareness: Detection.“)

For women age 40 and older, an annual mammogram is recommended, and this screening can catch cancer while it is still treatable.

Scheduling a mammogram is as easy as talking to your doctor and visiting your local hospital with a physician’s order. To make sure the mammogram is as accurate as possible, patients are told not to wear deodorant, creams, or powders to their appointment as these might interfere with the sensitive equipment.

After the images are taken, a radiologist will interpret the mammogram and send results to the patient’s physician. Sometimes, patients are asked to return for a follow up screening. This doesn’t mean there is a problem, only that additional images are needed for a correct diagnosis.

You can visit our online health library to learn more about breast cancer prevention, detection, and treatment.

Breast Cancer Awareness: Detection

Cancer can begin in any part of the body.

The different kinds of cancer are determined by where they start. Leukemias, for example, grow in bone marrow and are present in the blood stream. Lymphomas begin in the lymph nodes of the immune system. Sarcomas start in supporting tissues like bone, fat, and muscle.

Carcinomas, the most common types of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute, start in the cells that cover external and internal body surfaces – think lung, colon, and breast cancer.

Once cancer has begun to grow, even if it is extremely small, there are many ways we can detect it through regular screenings.

For breast cancer, mammograms remain the gold standard of early detection. They can find abnormalities before patients even notice symptoms. That’s why regular mammograms are important, especially for women age 40 and older and why it is critical to have access to the latest technology. 3D mammograms, for example, present a new era of early detection and better outcomes for women.

 

photo credit: Google

All women should be performing regular self-exams as well. This involves a simple process of feeling for lumps and looking for abnormalities in the mirror. Even if you are diligent about your annual screening, you are your own best tool to find problems and catch cancer early.

Download this helpful PDF from the United Breast Cancer Foundation to keep as a reference.

Breast Cancer Awareness: Detection

Cancer can begin in any part of the body.

The different kinds of cancer are determined by where they start. Leukemias, for example, grow in bone marrow and are present in the blood stream. Lymphomas begin in the lymph nodes of the immune system. Sarcomas start in supporting tissues like bone, fat, and muscle.

Carcinomas, the most common types of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute, start in the cells that cover external and internal body surfaces – think lung, colon, and breast cancer.

Once cancer has begun to grow, even if it is extremely small, there are many ways we can detect it through regular screenings.

For breast cancer, mammograms remain the gold standard of early detection. They can find abnormalities before patients even notice symptoms. That’s why regular mammograms are important, especially for women age 40 and older and why it is critical to have access to the latest technology. 3D mammograms, for example, present a new era of early detection and better outcomes for women.

 

photo credit: Google

All women should be performing regular self-exams as well. This involves a simple process of feeling for lumps and looking for abnormalities in the mirror. Even if you are diligent about your annual screening, you are your own best tool to find problems and catch cancer early.

Download this helpful PDF from the United Breast Cancer Foundation to keep as a reference.

Breast Cancer Awareness: What is Cancer?

Pink ribbons…walking for a cure…lumps and radiation…what is all this really about?

Cancer.

Specifically, breast cancer.

Every year in October, we work extra hard to make sure you are thinking about it and taking care to prevent it.

But what IS breast cancer? More importantly, what is cancer in general?

Every day, your body’s cells grow, die, regenerate and generally keep you alive. When they malfunction, they can grow out of control. This is cancer. Sometimes it presents as a malignant tumor – a mass of extra tissue made up of those abnormal, out of control cells.

The American Cancer Society tells us that most cancers forma s a tumor (others, like leukemia or blood cancer, do not). When that happens in breast tissue, we can find it with a simple screening – a mammogram. We can even use 3D technology to find cancerous masses when they are just beginning. And that early detection means longer lives.

Keep following our blog to learn more about breast cancer prevention and detection as we support Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Don’t forget, if you or a loved one needs to get a mammogram, October is a great month to do it. All patients who choose 3D mammography will receive a free fleece throw as a thank you from our family to yours. 

Greene County General Hospital Names New Director of Marketing

Stacy Burris to Head Hospital Promotions and Outreach

Stacy Burris has been named as the new Director of Marketing at Greene County General Hospital. Burris will replace outgoing director, Amy Lore, who has accepted a position outside the hospital.

Burris, a Linton resident, joins the hospital with a strong background in health care and economic and community development. Previously serving as the Director of Community Development for Radius Indiana, Stacy has a long history of building relationships, promoting local services, and supporting initiatives that improve and maintain quality of place.

Stacy has also worked in economic development at Hoosier Energy and as an Economic Research Analyst for Indiana State University. Stacy is a resident of Linton and holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Indiana State University (2015). She is also currently a graduate student in the Indiana State University Master of Public Administration program.